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Topic: Ever heard of a fainting angora?  (Read 5235 times)
dragonlair
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« on: September 30, 2011, 03:47:41 PM »

I work with a woman who has Angora goats. She just told me about an odd thing that happened with one of her wethers. He was grazing on the lawn when the dog came up form behind and startled the goat. The goat passed out cold! It took her a few minutes to get the goat to come round!

This is a registered purebred Angora.

Ever heard of this?
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Candace
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« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2011, 09:20:45 PM »

registered how? With CAGBA or AAGBA? That will give me a clue
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2011, 06:32:08 AM »

What breeds go into the "Angora" that created the breed? 

I didn't think "Angora" was an actual breed...

Now let me explain why I say this...I say this because I had a Boki Doe with Angora hair..she was registered top and bottom, and to register with the Kiko Association they had to be DNA tested, and she tested correctly on parentage...but she had the 1 to 1 and 1/2 inch long Angora hair...now go figure that.  Huh? Wink
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Candace
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« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2011, 08:06:33 AM »

The Angora IS a breed, the doe probably had cashmere type hair, not angora hair. Cashmere is a fiber that can show up on any breed of goat.
Angora hair grows 12 inches in a year; has to be sheared twice a year and grows it's hair steady.  It's a breed as old and created like the meat or dairy breeds.
1 to 1.5 inch hair is the cashmere type. not the angora. 
The assoc will tell me something about the goat. I'll exdplain later when I have time.
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sweetgoats
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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2011, 05:49:17 PM »

Yep Angora a breed it is Cashmere that is not called a breed. It is a type BUT they
Working on a registration.
  Yes almost all goats get a Cashmere type fiber(meaning it is soft and fluffy ) but it has to be a Minimum of 1-1/2 inches.
  I think that Angora goat just got the life scared out of him
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Lori

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dragonlair
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2011, 07:35:38 PM »

Don't know what it is registered with. She has a small herd that she uses for spinning.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2011, 06:49:01 AM »

So then my Beauty Goat was a cashmere goat...and the cashmere goat can be any breed of goat with that type of hair?  Hmmm?  Interesting...I am learning something new every day!  I will tell you though, I think that the Angora and the Cashmere goat is JUST BEAUTIFUL animals..my lil' Beauty was so Angelic. Smiley
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sweetgoats
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« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2011, 09:50:46 PM »

  A Cashmere goat is really a goat that is bred for their fiber and we bred them to increase the fine qualities of the fiber.

  So yes all goats have a cashmere TYPE fiber it is really NOT cashmere unless it is at least 1-1/2" long and the Micron count of the Fiber is 18.5 Micron or below.  So yes all goat But Angora goats will get a fluffy "winter coat", it is a soft cashmere TYPE fiber. 
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Lori

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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2011, 04:13:21 AM »

Beauty kept her long curly locks of hair year round.  She never did "shed" that out in the summer months.  Her hair was about 1 to 1 and 1/2 inches long but I never checked it for Micron's.  I just know she was so soft and so beautiful (hence her name "Beauty").  In the summer she would shed out the under coat, the soft fluffy stuff, like the other goats would shed out, and her long locks wouldn't be as thick as they were in the winter, but her hair was still really long. 

I never could figure that out on her, as her kids never had her long hair or curly like hers was.  She was a Registered Genemaster goat..and to get that registration the DNA had to check out and go back to the parentage we claimed her to be out of...her father a Registered Boer Goat and her mother a Registered 100% NZ Kiko. 

Isn't that odd..I loved that goat so much...in the winter all I wanted to do was keep my hands deeply inbedded into her hair, it was extremely soft and extremely thick! hahaha.  Grin
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Candace
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2011, 09:05:04 AM »

I get where you are coming from, years ago I looked into the cashmere, and was told at that point they weren't a breed, but different breeds did produce the cashmere type fiber, yes, it would need to be microned, to make sure of the fineness, but as an actual breed, it didn't exist, but you looked for the goats, within the different breeds, that produced the fiber. The people I talked to said that was why there is not an association as the goat itself is not a breed, it is a fiber you are looking to produce, so the look of the goat that produced the cashmere fiber was all over the place. The cashmere goat was any breed of goat that produced cashmere fiber. I had a They were trying at that time to concentrate and get goats that routinely produced the cashmere fiber.
I had a boer doe once, and she every year produced the cashmere fiber, yes, the  1.5 to 2 inch super soft cashmere fiber. So it's not the goat, that makes them a cashmere goat, but the fiber. In a way, it's true with Angora too, as its the fiber that makes the Angora an Angora goat....But the cashmere can be on any goat, most typically I have been told, it's dairy goats they saw it on.....

Now, with the original question. I will try to be quick, if you have more questions, ask and I'll try to clarify.
With AAGBA is the registry for white angora goats.
The CAGBA and ACAGR re colored angora goat registries, there was a fall out with people that tried to become tyrannical, like it typically can happen when you have a new breed forming.
The angora goat is an ancient breed, there are American and South African angora goats typically. The breed was culled hard for plain white goats for commercial purposes. The SA culled to a different standard than the American. There is a lady that did intensive study of the lines and over about 20 years of selective breeding now is getting color from pure white stock.
The other two associations basically have a hybrid breed of goat. It now looks just like an angora, but back in the 40's and 50's people started wanting color on the curl naturally. So they started cross breeding the different breeds with the angora, taking that goat back to the angora, etc etc, to breed up the angora characteristics but with the color and pattern they got from the crosses. So now, almost 80 years later, they have a colored goat that is angora style, and that is what is registered with the other two associations.

Now, that is why I asked where it was registered, as if it is the one that is produced by the lady that did the research, then I would say it does not have any fainting goat in it and that was just a fluke. BUT, if it is registered with one of the other two associations then I would say it could have fainting goat in it somewhere.

Then also, within the colored, is the Navajo style, and it is just what it sounds, it was a breed that the Navajo bred, had less grease, more open style, but was a breed that developed with color or white, by the Navajo. There is now a registry forming for them also to preserve the ancient breed and style.
http://www.navajoangoragoat.org/
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2011, 09:59:41 AM »

See I learn something new every day...My Beauty goat was no where near as beautiful as Sweetgoats goaties are, but she was beautiful none the less.  I just loved her soft flowing angelic hair, and her personality matched her hair to a "T".  She was so sweet and gentle and loving.  I do dearly miss her.
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sweetgoats
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« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2011, 04:31:53 PM »

Just to clarify something that was said.
  Angora goats DO NOT produce angora. They produce mohair. It is Angora rabbits that produce Angora.  Wink
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Lori

Home of the Colorado State Fair Grand Champion doe, 2003,2004,2005,2007,2008,2009. and 2011.
Premier Breeder and Premier Exhibitor for 2008 and 2009.
Candace
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« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2011, 07:35:00 PM »

Yeah, that's why I didn't say the it's the angora fiber that makes them an angora goat.
I just said it's the fiber that makes them the goat, Fiber being the mohair. lol angora fiber would make them the rabbit!  Grin
Good you clarified that, I didn't even think of clarifying it. Kewl to have a fiber person, lots of Milk and tons of meat, but not as many fiber goat ppl on here!

But Pam, is this something else you learned today?
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 07:38:25 PM by Candace » Logged
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2011, 08:00:42 PM »

Well I knew about the Angora Rabbits, and their fur is what we get sweaters made of right?  Those high dollar sweaters that only the "stars" can wear!! hahaha.  ROFL...  Grin Grin  just kidding.

with the goats, I did know it was called "mohair", why it was called that is what I don't know..if it's an "Angora" goat, then why not call it "angora" fiber?  Pygmy's are goats and rattlers, so why not angora goats, and rabbits?  Huh?

Education states here in the forum..no need to go to the college..we got it all right here..and it's FREE!! ahahahah.  Grin Grin  just kidding.  Daytime and night time classes available!! hahaha. ROFL.LOL.CWL.  Grin Grin
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dragonlair
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« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2011, 11:37:50 AM »

The way she described the goats "faint" didn't sound like what a fainting goat does. I know they are white and she paid a good price for them because of the quality of their fiber.

Even if it had a fainter several generations back, would it faint? Wouldn't the fainting gene be too diluted?
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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