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Topic: Goat gets stuck in fence  (Read 9899 times)
Valley View
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« on: May 29, 2012, 08:28:51 PM »

I have a nanny goat that keeps trying to eat the grass on the other side of the fence. She has plenty of good grass in the pasture but insists on sticking her head through the 4 x 4 inch mesh fence. Her horns get stuck and I am regularly getting her out of there. I know this is not the ideal fence for goats, but when we bought the property, this fence was already up and in great shape. Can you trim an adult goats horns??? I hate to invest in more fencing or electric fence since the pasture is about 2 acres. Any thoughts????

Thanks!!
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Candace
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2012, 08:49:46 PM »

OK, get duct tape and a long stick, then duct tape the stick crosswise across the horns really good near the top. She won't be able to get her head through the fence, it will last a good long while.  Wink
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Valley View
Bouncing Babies
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2012, 09:07:02 PM »

I never thought of that. Thanks! I will try it tomorrow.
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nancy d
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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2012, 09:26:54 PM »

Yep Candace hit the fence with her head. They look silly as all get out but it really does work.
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taelir
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« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2012, 11:47:35 PM »

I am SO making a mental note to try that stick-and-tape trick! One of my fainter does is the biggest dummy when it comes to one side of our fencing.

And I know many are against electric fence (hey, it's not my ideal either) but I have to say it worked wonders with my one cashmere who kept doing the same thing. We put in a single trainer wire along the fence panels right at the height where she'd poke her big ol' head through. Didn't take her more than a couple hours to stop trying it! I was able to take the wire down after that and we haven't had any problems, but I wouldn't hesitate to set the "brat wire" back up if she forgot Smiley
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Rockytopsis
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WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2012, 05:51:12 AM »

You can also take a length of rubber hose about 2 feet long. Stick each end on her horn and duct tape them to her horns. This will lengthen her horn and stop her like the sticks do.

I have used this and the stick method also, the stick broke so we went to pvc pipe whick broke then a medal rod. They all worked moderately well.

Rocky
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A & N Lazy Pond Farm, a small Boer Goat farm in East Tennessee
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« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2012, 09:09:44 AM »

I guess this is why people get goats disbudded??? Is there another reason? Sorry, question may get us on another topic that belongs in the Vet forum.  Thanks eveyone.
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Sally P
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« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2012, 09:36:05 AM »

Yes, there is another reason.  Our goats are a show herd, and show goats can not have horns.  The oother reasons are:  safety--especially around children; milking--it is pretty difficult to get a goat with horns into a milk stand; getting stuck in fences.
It takes 12 seconds on each side to disbud a kid when done correctly.  It is much less traumatic than people think.  Usually it is more difficult on the breeders than on the goats.  We disbud many many goats each year, not only our own, but for a lot of other people also.  If done when it should be done (as soon as you can feel the horn buds--before they pop thru the skin), it is a procedure that takes longer to catch and carry the goat to the disbudding area, then it does to do the actual procedure.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2012, 11:41:32 AM by Sally P » Logged
Candace
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« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2012, 03:55:33 PM »

... like my nabians and milker disbudded but I leave the horns on the angoras. Sometimes it's a reason, sometimes personal preference  Wink
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dragonlair
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« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2012, 10:45:51 AM »

I now have a single hot wire along the inside of all the goat and dogs fencing. It keeps them off the fence and they won't try to push or go thru it. All it takes is one zap and they stay away. Hasn't injured any of them, not even the kids, and they have all had their turns getting zapped. I will never put up fencing again without a hot wire along the inside.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
sweetgoats
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« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2012, 12:40:27 PM »

  Yep, I use a PVC pipe only because i don't want another goat hit with a stick.  A round end is sfare for me.

  I duck tape them as wel. I have to go find the pipe every week or so and retape it. 
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Lori

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hhernandez13
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« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2012, 08:37:29 PM »

i first tried the pvc pipe idea with duct or electrical tape. they still came off after a couple of weeks.  i think a single strand of electrical wire placed about twelve inches above the ground or high enough to where it will touch their chest will work great. i havent had a single goat stuck in the fence in a year.
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taelir
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« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2012, 10:32:22 PM »

If the wire touches their chest, it isn't going to do a whole lot unless you're using a low-impedance charger with a heck of a bite. It sounds brutal, but a zap to the nose will teach them VERY quickly. A nose just conducts far better than the chest (with thicker skin and hair) will.

I set my 'brat' wire up right along the height of the panels where my one doe would shove her head through, and it fixed her up in a single day. I haven't had a single issue in months and the wire isn't even hot right now! It's just a visual reminder at this point LOL
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Earlyriser
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« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2012, 05:26:00 AM »

I know this is an old post but it is December and going out in the cold doesn't seem appealing right now so old posts are agood pastime. After I taped the pvc pipe across the horns I sprayed roundup on a strip about 3 feet wide outside the fence. After a week or so when the grass died I took the pipe off and didn't have any more trouble. By fall when all those tempting dead leaves were being blown past, his head was too big to get out any longer.
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2012, 05:45:02 AM »

here's another hint to killing weeds/grass on the outside of your fence line that's not toxic to any animal..(round-up is deadly if a goat/other livestock eats it)...use..

White Vinegar, mixed with dishsoap (can be the cheaper kind--ultra preferably), or cheap Veggie oil...this will safely kill the weeds in and around the goat pens, without worry of toxic poisoning, and it will last a good long time.  The dishsoap is safe for the earth as well...veggie oil will work longer in the heat of the summer though.
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~ Birdie ~
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