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Topic: Fencing  (Read 8522 times)
MollyBelle
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Posts: 85



« on: February 21, 2013, 10:01:01 PM »

What type of fencing do you use?

Has anyone had luck with simple electric wire fencing?
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 10:17:42 PM by MollyBelle » Logged

Molly & Belle
taelir
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2013, 10:37:00 PM »

We currently have a combination of fencing setups. We're in the process of entirely redoing our pens, though.

We use cattle panel as well as hot wire. With hot wire you have to use multiple strands and turn the pulsing up. We also use a single strand of hot wire inside our cashmere pen (cattle panels) because one of our does is a dummy and constantly gets her head stuck. We call it the 'brat wire' LOL. Nice thing about hot wire fencing is that you can usually turn it down or off once they learn to respect the boundaries. My one doe still hasn't realized her wire's been turned off for a while now Wink

That said, it's not my first choice of fencing. We just use it because it helps keep coyotes away and we already had circuits set up for the cattle that we could tap into. If it were up to me, I'd use cattle panels or five-strand fencing with a single hot wire strand added in.
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19331


Texas


« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2013, 07:24:12 AM »

I don't care for electric fencing...

I cried when I put that up...took it down the same day it was finished and goat babies hit that hot wire...made me sick to my stomach...then I cried again when I put the proper fencing for them up...crying twice is no fun...cry once and do it right.

fallen limbs will kill the hot wire fence, grass will kill the hot wire fence, and so forth...too much work and up keep not to mention watching your goats scream when shocked by it.
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~ Birdie ~
Sally P
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Posts: 8923


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2013, 09:44:19 AM »

Doo yourself a favor and do not use electric.  It is a waste of time and money.  They will go under, thru, over it----believe me.

What you want to look for is cattle panels (that's what they call them up here).  They are rigid wird, 16 feet long and about 50 inches tall.  TSC and Agway carry them.  They are cost saving for these reasons:  the goats can stand up on them but won't bend them over; you save in fence posts:  cedar posts and each fence uses three (one in the middle and one on each end.  The end ones also hold the next fence piece.  All our pastures are done in these panels and even USDA people here recommend them now for goat breeders.  The panels are about $25.00 each.  They will last (even with a hundred goats in the pasture) for a long time.  If you need to cut them for a gate, or a corner, it is easily done.
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imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2013, 10:11:32 AM »

Panels work great, but I don't suggest Cattle panels at all, unless you have a herd that has no horns.  Cutting a goat out of a cattle panel that has horns, destroys a lot of money....buy the goat panels and be safer and have a better panel made for your animal.
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~ Birdie ~
Sally P
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New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2013, 02:21:11 PM »

Cattle panels are what they call them up here.  I wouldn't put the extra money into "goat" panels.  They are pricy just because they are fairly new and marked for goats.  Goats that have horns can get caught in any type of fence.
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2013, 07:08:29 AM »

 Grin Grin  My entire herd was horned goats...had them get caught up in many "cattle" panels..had to cut the cattle panel to get them out...went to the goat panels and no more issues of head caught.  Ask HappyJunker how many cattel panels she had to cut one of her wethers out of...  Grin Grin  If they are ruined from having to cut goats out of, then how expensive is that?  Twice the cost of one goat panel.  Grin Grin  Again I say..."do it right the first time, and cry once."
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~ Birdie ~
MollyBelle
Bouncing Babies
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Posts: 85



« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2013, 09:21:53 AM »

lol, you two are funny. No worries, cattle panels will probably work for us, all my goats will be disbudded goats...children will be handling them consistantly so we wouldnt want to chance anything with the horns, but its definitely good to know our options if things should change and we someday end up with horned goats Smiley
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Molly & Belle
Valley View
Bouncing Babies
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Posts: 73


« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2013, 06:35:15 AM »

When we bought our property, most of the existing fencing was cattle panels. We have one doe who keeps getting her head stuck. I am gradually switching to goat panel. So far so good.
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MedsHomestead
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Posts: 118



« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2014, 12:02:48 PM »

See, I'm on the other side of the fence (Bahaha - I crack myself up) regarding electric fencing.

 For me woven wire fence is cost prohibitive, and hard for me to install by myself - our farm is very hilly and overgrown in many areas, an alternative in our area to woven wire fence is welded, and boy on boy my goats just tear that up - the welds break easily and they'll go though it in a minute. I like the cattle/goat panels (in our area there is very little difference in the 2), but I'd be digging post holes for eternity if I were to use them for all the areas I want to pasture.

 I use 5 or 6 strands of electric and basically they only have to be shocked once and they respect the fence - providing it is strung tightly (it is hard to watch them get that initial shock but generally they stay a good distance after the first one)  I also would like to try the electric netting fencing - we have a couple of farms that have made their business using that and a marine battery - they rent their goats out to clean out ares that are hard to manage with gas powered equipment - I'd like to do that, but my goats are my babies and I want them home at night - and I have plenty of ares for them to clean up right here at home and I know they will be safe!

Now it is true, I have to weed wack the perimeter often, and fallen limbs are a problem, but as another poster stated, once they know the fence bites, it can be unplugged - I haven't had mine hot for several weeks.

 I absolutely abhor barbed wire fence - I think that stuff should be outlawed!  I have been removing very old barbed from our farm and can't wait to have it all gone!
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dragonlair
Herdmaster
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Posts: 9468



« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2014, 03:32:31 PM »

I use several different fences. My favorite are the cattle panels. I also have chain link fencing, welded wire fencing, pallets as fencing and electric wire fencing. So far so good.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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