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Topic: Electric fence advice  (Read 2615 times)
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Bouncing Babies
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« on: March 28, 2013, 09:38:29 PM »

I have a buck that I want to put in a seperate pasture from my 3 does. The two pastures share a common fence line that is about 200 feet in length. It is not a very good fence as it was my first fence I put up. I have gotten better. My mistake was that I did not stretch it tight enough and there is some slack. I tried to put my buck in the new pasture I fenced. I did a better job with the new fence lines, but he keeps getting through the older common fence line. Refencing this thing would be a pain to say the least. My question is, do you think an electric fence would keep him out? If so, I may get one quickly. Any advice on what to get and how to install? Thanks in advance. Still learning. As Dragonlair put it on another thread, there is nothing like a buck to teach you about fencing.
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taelir
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2013, 12:02:14 AM »

Hot wire is a touchy subject around here, so fair warning Wink

We use combination fencing on occasion and it works for us. I have one doe, for example, who would repeatedly shove her head through the panel fencing and get stuck. We ran a single strand of hot wire at the height where she normally shoved her bean through. It didn't take her long to stop. We actually don't even have the wire 'turned on' right now...the visual reminder is enough for her.

Now, we were lucky in some senses. We have a lot of hot wire strung up for cattle because with the acreage they're on, it's cost-effective and it works for them. Since we already had a circuit set up and a good charging unit, we're able to loop in extra strands as needed. Hot wire will never work as good with goats as it does with cattle, though...has to do with the physical weight of the animal and the resistance it provides, as well as intelligence of the animal.

If it were entirely up to me, though, I'd do something more permanent. Physical barriers will always work best and if they're done right they don't require constant maintenance like hot wire will. The hot wire on its own - at least in my personal opinion - won't be sufficient enough unless you're running multiple strands, and that turns to a whole other ordeal. Especially when we're talking about bucks...we all know how persistent they can be. LOL
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2013, 06:22:09 AM »

Here's my experiences with hotwire...

1st off I agree with Taelir...it's a touchy subject here...some like it and some don't.  Those that like it "really" swear by it, and those who don't like it, absolutely "detest" it.

2nd off...I put hotwire around my bucks, to help protect my fences and escapes into other buck pens/pastures when the rut begins and the fighting wars are on...and let me tell you something...it made my bucks 10x's meaner, and one absolutely lost his mind...was sent to slaughter because you couldn't control him any longer...You take my Taddy (a wether now but was a buck back then), if he even hears a fencer ticking, as tame and gentle as he is, he goes out of his mind with anger.  If one of my boys gets shocked, you best get out of the pasture, they turn into raving lunatics!! 

3rd off...my kids got shocked so hard (yes even with a solar fencer), that I couldn't stand seeing that, so that brand new, up 1 day, 6 strand hotwire fence came down the same day it was finished and we put the proper fencing up for the babies.

As you can tell...I am one that detests hotwire fencing for goats.  It does have it's good points with other livestock though...but believe me, my bucks figured out how to ground that hotwire out and break through any way.  All it takes is a touch of the horn to push it against a steel post and it's grounded out.  Solar fencers are no good on goats. 

I will say this, we all have to do what works best for us and our farms...I'm not against someone else using it, but I will not advise someone using it...to me, it's a waste of good money. 
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~ Birdie ~
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2013, 07:50:27 AM »

Thanks for the warning. I think I will pass on hot wire. It sounds like no matter how good my fence is, the buck will constantly challenge it until it is week enough to get through. I am back to square one. I think he is getting  through by slipping under the fence. I may line the whole 100 ft fence line with tree trunks fron fallen trees in the woods. That worked in my doe pen. The reason I am apprehensive about refencing is that I am afraid to mess with my t-posts. I barely got them in the ground due to the shallow rock layer here in TN. So, I think lining the bottom of my fence may be the ticket.
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Sally P
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New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 08:21:20 AM »

I would never again spend money on electric fencing.  We put 5 strands up one time and then put the goats in their new pasture.  It lasted just long enough for me to walk back to the house---they were right behind me!  They went over, under, thru.  Didn't bother them at all.  So it was a total waste of $$ and time.
Yes---put some logs on the bottom of that fence.  The reason your buck is acting so is because he is alone.  You can't take a goat that has been with companions and suddenly put him alone.  Get a wether for him asap.  Problems will stop.
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Bouncing Babies
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2013, 08:54:52 AM »

Sally P. I think that is the route
I will take. Thank every one for the advice. You saved me some money.
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sweetgoats
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2013, 09:35:18 AM »

  I used hot wire on the fence that the boys and girls had in common.  I put it about the head height.  They were destroying the fence like no other.  The girls would back to the fence and wave their tails to the bucks when they were in heat, and the boys of course were trying to get to them. lol 

  SO the girls stayed away from the fence and the boys would paw, flap their tongue and stuff from about a foot from the fence.

  I also had a fence that was about 300 yards or more.  I have several strand of hot wire and plain wire.  "It was not ever for the babies", but the girls would go to it, some would touch it with their nose, and it only took once, they jumped back and never got close again, the boys, they would get zapped, but they were so big they would just go through the fence FAST.

  SO long story short, I like the electric fence one strand to keep them back from the fence that they share the fence. 
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Lori

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Julie H
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Missouri


« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2013, 01:35:28 PM »

I always have the woven wire as my permanent fencing for goats.  At our last place we also ran a strand of electric tape along the inside to keep the sheep and goats off the fence. As I mentioned on your other thread I would never use it for any animal as a only fence. Just to " beef up" what you already have.  A wether companion will keep him pretty content. I just finished pimping out my boer buck and right before the owners came to get their does, I put my wether back in with him and he didn't miss the does at all.  My Pygmy buck lives with my 19 month old steer and they are so cute together. I worry what will happen when he goes into the freezer. I may just put him in with my Jersey milk cow, she likes him too.
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2013, 08:13:17 PM »

OK. Opting out of electric fence option. My son and I lined the fence bottom with fallen tree trunks and nailed them to the fence bottom. I think I solved the going under the fence problem. I also had some extra goat fence and put it up on the opposite side of the t posts, so in effect double fencing. Tomorrow I am going to spearate the buck and see if my fortress holds. I am becoming a fence expert. I love my buck too much to get rid of him. He is a good herd sire.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2013, 06:00:17 PM »

I use e fence along with the cattle panels and livestock fencing just to keep them off the fence. It works well. 1 or 2 strands and they stay away from the fence.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2013, 03:50:51 AM »

Also use aluminum wire. It conducts better and it will break easier if an animal gets caught on it. I had a doeling break it getting out. She safely got the message and milled around until I opened the gate for her return.
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