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Topic: How to get rid of Carpenter Bees  (Read 7022 times)
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19370


Texas


« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2013, 07:11:54 AM »

that's what I'm saying Brenda...

Our barn back in AR is over 12 yrs old now...it's treated with the used motor oil...I've been gone from there 3 yrs...so no treatments were put on it since then...we have it listed for sale, so we had to do the termite/bug inspection of house and barn...NOTHING is in that wood, no termites, no bore bees, no nothing.  Or at least that's what the inspector said...and our Renter said the same thing.

The deck on the back of the trailer is now 5 yrs old, and the bore bees are thick as theives here....and no they aren't bothering that wood at all.

The new woods are all doing just fine so far too.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Posts: 1636


Missouri


« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2013, 02:05:11 PM »

Do they treat lumber with different chemicals in different places??
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imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2013, 05:57:23 AM »

Well that's possible Julie.

Arkansas would be treated heavier for termite protection, since it's the natural state, trees are cut with permits only...and down here in the south, the lumber is hurricane and termite treated.  The lumber we built the 16 x 32 building with and the decks steps were soaking wet when we bought them...putting screws into them, they oozed the treatment stuff.

In our stalls back home, the roughen sawn oak was raw wood...we laid each board into the hot sun, allowed the board to get super hot, allowed the used motor oil to sit in the sun and get hot as well, and then painted it onto the boards...we left the boards out in the sun until it dried, recoated it again and waited about an hour or so and then put them into the stalls.  We built the dutch doors to the stalls out of the same lumber.  All six of them are doing well, no signs of bug infestations or bees, according to the inspector.  We built that barn in 2003...so I lied, I said it was 12 yrs old, it's actually 10 years old.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
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« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2013, 05:26:49 PM »

Maybe the wood in Birdies area is treated with a different chemical mix than elsewhere?
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2013, 06:01:11 AM »

it's a possiblilty for sure that they are treated with different stuff...but Arkansas is the same as Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas and other surrounding mid central states.  Our horse stall lumber was raw wood...we treated that with old used motor oil...usually treated it once a year to, but now we're down here and it's been over 3 yrs since it was treated with the oil...and still nothing in that wood at all.  The oil was the only thing that roughen sawn Oak was treated with.
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~ Birdie ~
Valley View
Bouncing Babies
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Posts: 73


« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2013, 12:31:11 PM »

I have never heard of the motor oil treatment. Do you just brush it on with a paint brush.??? Can you paint over it once you treat it?
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Julie H
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Posts: 1636


Missouri


« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2013, 01:21:02 PM »

I would think that the oil would bleed through any paint you use or keep the paint from sticking/ soaking into the wood.
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19370


Texas


« Reply #22 on: April 29, 2013, 06:36:11 AM »

I have never heard of the motor oil treatment. Do you just brush it on with a paint brush.??? Can you paint over it once you treat it?

Our first initial treatment of the raw wood was to leave it out in the hot sun, along with the motor oil, so the wood and the oil were as hot as possible when we applied it to the wood...when the wood/oil were hot/warm, we brushed it on with heavy brushes.  The reason for heavy brushes was because roughen sawn oak is just that...rough, very very rough grains of wood...meaning it's not been plained down smooth...so we needed a lot of oil going on to soak through that roughness.  You can apply it with a roller, or even a sprayer...but you're going to have to put it on as thick as you can...then you leave it sit in the hot sun to soak in and "bake" so to speak...we then went back and put another coat on when that soaked in...allowed that to soak in some more and then we put the wood up on the walls of the stalls.  Oak is very dense, very hard wood, so the oil also helped us to put the screws into it easier...the soaked oiled boards were softer, and we weren't breaking as many screws putting the boards up on the walls. 

Heat opens the pores of wood...so the longer it sits in the sun, the better off you are.  Once the oil is applied, it soaks in pretty fast, and will be ready to treat the other side within an hour or so, depending on how hot your sunshine is.  We worked on our in Mid July, so it was really hot outdoors.  By night fall we had all the coats of oil we needed on both sides of the boards, and the next day about mid day, we were ready to put the boards onto the walls.  We treated rafters, wall boards, studs, and cross studs with the oil...this preserves your wood as well as it detours insects and rodents. 

We use to do this to our wood fencing back in the early 70's...to keep our horses from cribbing on the wood fence...it worked great, and it worked just as great with our goats too.

No, I doubt you can paint over this wood after it's been treated with oils...you might if it's been 2 to 5 yrs after the treatment of oil..but I don't think you'll like what you get from it.  You know painted wood isn't good to have with goats...they do like to chew wood, and they will chew painted walls.  But I do think it might help to keep insects such as the bore bees out of it.
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~ Birdie ~
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