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Topic: Her milk is pink  (Read 874 times)
MedsHomestead
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« on: March 16, 2015, 11:45:57 AM »

I have an alpine/nubian cross who is 3 years old - she was small so I didn't breed her until she was 2. When 2 of my other does freshened (before this doe was bred) she became a maiden milker, but only on one side - noticeably lopsided. I checked for mastitis and tried to dry her off, but she kept milk that whole year and during the time she was bred. When she freshened the other side of her udder produced milk but she was still lopsided and her milk was tinged pink. You really didn't notice it until the milk was refrigerated, the the blood would settle to the bottom. Again I tested for mastitis, and really kept examining her udder and attachment for any damage. Since I was milking by hand I took the kids away from all the does and bottle fed them so there was no injury there fro rough kids. I have her dried off right now but her udder is still noticeably lopsided. I'm wondering if capillaries broke and if there is anything I can do to avoid a repeat of this when she freshens again? Her milk has a good flavor, it is just kind of unappetizing...
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sweetgoats
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2015, 02:36:44 PM »

  I think you nailed it on the head there.  I bet  capillaries were ruptured.  Most the time if you keep milking them it will go away, kind of like a burse.  As for the lopsided, I would think it is going to be a bit of work to get her back to normal size being that one side was being milked.

  I would be she will be fine next time. 
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Lori

Home of the Colorado State Fair Grand Champion doe, 2003,2004,2005,2007,2008,2009. and 2011.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2015, 03:16:00 PM »

Vitamin C will help the inflamation and keep the blood to a minimum.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2015, 06:42:52 AM »

Can't add much more to what's been said already...lopsidedness is a hard one to get back right.  But with a lot of work, you can do it. Smiley
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dragonlair
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2015, 02:30:52 PM »

Yeah, once an udder is lopsidded, it can be really hard to get even again. That's why most dairy people who show will not allow kids to be dam raised.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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