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Topic: Good bye Joy  (Read 1991 times)
Julie H
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Posts: 1634


Missouri


« on: January 16, 2016, 01:31:54 PM »

 Cry

She had a whopping case of BP worm after weaning her 2 kids this year.  Thought I caught her early enough,did the 3 days of Cydectin with a follow up at 2 weeks, but she never bounced back. I have been penning her and feeding her special but she just kept getting weaker and even though she had a decent appetite she would not put on weight.  This morning she was flat out ( someone may have knocked her down) . I righted her and she cried out, but stayed up. Would not eat.

With single digit temps starting tonight and a few below freezing days in store, I knew the stress of that would cause her to suffer, so my husband put her down.  Here she is in her better days.



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blessednest
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Posts: 1391



« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2016, 02:41:50 PM »

So sorry for your loss. It's never easy or even gets easier. I have one wearing a sweatshirt right now and I almost dread going to the barn to do chores.
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Central Ohio
nancy d
Herdmaster
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Posts: 6046

N.W. WA


« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2016, 05:39:20 PM »

Oh so sorry for the loss of your beautiful doe. There are times the kindest unselfish thing we can do is end their suffering.
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19365


Texas


« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2016, 04:51:35 AM »

Oh Julie, I'm so sorry to hear this.   Cry Some times, they just can't come back from BP.  The BP Worm, I assure you wasn't what took her life.  It's the cause of her degeneration, but it was the affects of the anemia that she couldn't bounce back from.  You did all you could, and in the end, you did the kindest thing you could possibly do for her.  She was suffering, and to leave her that way, would have been inhumane.  She was a beautiful girl and I'm sure you'll miss her something awful.

I know those Missouri winters can be harsh.  I feel every day, when I go out and see Prince shivering in even 30 degree weather, that he wouldn't make it through the Arkansas winters.  Down here he struggles, but nothing like it would be back home.  I'm like Juli, I hate to look out there of a morning, fearing what I might find. 

Your Joy, has gone over the Rainbow bridge and I'm sure my Socks is there, waiting to play and romp with her in the green meadows of home.   Bug Hug
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Posts: 1634


Missouri


« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2016, 01:16:51 PM »

Thanks everyone.  It never stops being a gut wrenching decision.  I feel bad for my husband having to always do the dirty work.  When she was still laying in the same place I left her that morning,  I knew she couldn't get up anymore.  The herd was in the pasture.

I was giving redcell, but she was just so thin and weak. I knew she wasn't bred( thankfully) no way in her condition would she have had a heat, let alone keep standing when the buck mounted her.   Her mother had some health issues this past year  and I was never pleased with her looks.  wonder if it is a genetic thing?  I have not kept any of their offspring as breeding does because of it.
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ilroost
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Posts: 361



« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2016, 03:41:00 PM »

So sorry for your loss
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19365


Texas


« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2016, 04:28:01 AM »

Ya know Julie, there is a lot to be said for strong genetics.  There are some that have weaker immune systems than others.  I think that's why a lot of ranchers do the "cull" thing.  Keeping the strongest and selling off the weakest. 
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1634


Missouri


« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2016, 01:31:30 PM »

That is what I have been doing the last 2 years.  Time will tell.
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dragonlair
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Posts: 9493



« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2016, 02:33:58 PM »

Worm resistance has been found to be genetic. I am working on that, hoping I can get it right!
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1634


Missouri


« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2016, 01:27:14 PM »

Worm resistance has been found to be genetic. I am working on that, hoping I can get it right!

I would say 90% of my does have never succumbed to any severe worm issues but it seems that the ones who have are either siblings( twins) or out of a doe who has had a severe bout with BPW sometime in her life.

I wonder if even after being treated and recovered , do these does who have had such a battle, are they ever 100% right again?  Can having a severe case with BP cause a doe to abort later on ?
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19365


Texas


« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2016, 04:51:44 AM »

I do believe with all my heart that there are genetics that are weaker and more susceptible to health issues, worm over loads and so forth.  But I also believe with all my heart that even though they have weaker immune systems, it doesn't make them bad goats or goats that can't thrive.  We just have to stay in tune with that weakness and build them up.  I've been goat herding now for over 20 yrs.  I've never had one case of BP, and I've rescued countless goats that were terrible sick when I got them, and I've went on to breed them and they've become awesome animals and their kids thrived well and went on to be junior breeders.  With these goats that I rescued and had health issues or worm overloads (none had the BP worm though), I kept them on Fastrack.  Now that builds the immune system and restores the vital organs to their proper size and function.  I am a firm believer in the Fastrack, and all it's worth and value when raising livestock animals.  However, with that said, the product has gotten so expensive that I can't afford it any more and I'm a distributor getting the wholesale price on it and I still can't afford it.  The product isn't so expensive, but the shipping was costing more than the product itself.  So hence, we've gone another route, not as good as Fastrack, but seems to be maintaining and doing alright (we still have moments with Prince that makes me wonder though, whereas when he was on Fastrack he was never sick)...I am giving the Yobaby yogurt twice weekly to all my goats, not the full ounce of it, each gets a half ounce, but Prince he gets the full ounce 3 times a week, and I'm giving him a half slice of wheat bread (though he doesn't want that any more and it's hard to get him to eat it), along with a good human form of probiotic.  Trying to keep their immune systems as high as I possibly can.  Hanna and Mercy have never ever been sick (except Hanna's heat stroke last summer--and Mercy being very sick when I got her).  So it might be working pretty good, I don't know...I'm just thanking God something is working. 

My point is, if we take these weaker animals, and put them on something that will build their natural immune systems up, then we can still have strong Goats, who go on to breed and give birth to strong kids.  There is a product that Conklin sells as well as the Fastrack that's called "Jump Start"...I still have that in my frig in fact.  We use to give this to every newborn kid, doesn't take but a tiny wee dab of it called 5grams on the dial.  This was also given to any new goat that we got that wasn't on fastrack when we got them.  This is a product that is in the blood stream within 5 minutes.  It jump starts the immune system, and you only give it once.  We used this product on any goat that wouldn't eat or was off food.  Maybe that was the key to the newborns out of the weaker immune system Does, I don't know for sure, as after a dose of Jump Start, the weaker Does were given the Fastrack Ruminant Gel once daily for 3 days and then onto the fastrack powder from there. 

In all these Does that we've had over the years that were sickly, and weak when we got them, only one of them aborted.  She was our one and only goat to have ever aborted on our farm over all those years.  I suppose I was just lucky and still remain lucky to this day, as BP is really bad down here in the deep south.  Thank you Lord for all these blessings over all these years. 
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1634


Missouri


« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2016, 01:26:59 PM »

We were at the MO Pork Expo last week and there was a fasttrack dealer there.  They are supposed to be sending me more info.  I know that I need something for the 3 does who need a boost after severe BP infestation this summer. None are bred and I would like to take this time off to get them back to the condition they were in the past.  What do you suggest?
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19365


Texas


« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2016, 04:27:09 AM »

If you can get the Fastrack, and can afford it, I highly suggest it.  I am a distributor (like the guy you saw at the Expo), and I'm telling you...the product of 16.50 and the shipping at 19.00 for a single 5lb bag of fastrack made it too costly for me and that's my wholesale price.  Resale price is way over 25.00 per bag, plus the 19.00 for shipping, it's not worth that to me. 

Those that need that extra boost would sure benefit from it.  It's really good stuff.  However, not too long ago, there was a Farm store that was selling a product called "Right Track"...seems to me that farm store was named "King" or something like that.  Anyway, I ordered a bag of it to see how it compared to the Fastrack.  While yes, it was very close, it was nothing like the fastrack when it came down to what all it did for the animal.  I used the fastrack on all my animals...dogs, cats, chickens, hogs, cattle, horses, and yes my goats.  I swore by it, until they got it so dog gone high, that you can't afford to feed it.  There is a water soluble Fastrack that you can put in the water...don't waste your money on that.  Goats are not big water drinkers and won't get enough in their systems to work properly.  It's great for cattle and hogs, but not for goats.  Horses, chickens, goats, sheep, all do better on the fastrack powder.

At this point, I'd keep the ones who really need it on a Probiotic once daily.  Jeffers sells the large container of Probio's.  And maybe see if you can find some dandelion tea leaves at a Health food store or GNC or where ever you can find it.  That will help to rebuild and detox the liver.  I'm sure it's a liver issue what keeps them from thriving. 
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~ Birdie ~
sweetgoats
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WWW
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2016, 04:42:59 PM »

She was a beautiful girl, she is pain free and running in those green pastures.
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Lori

Home of the Colorado State Fair Grand Champion doe, 2003,2004,2005,2007,2008,2009. and 2011.
Premier Breeder and Premier Exhibitor for 2008 and 2009.
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