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Topic: just tasted some funky milk  (Read 747 times)
Goshen goaties
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« on: April 08, 2016, 09:14:43 AM »

So my first doe, a 4 year old Alpine, kidded last Tuesday.  Two beautiful Alpine/Nubians kids... So cute!  My plan is to let the kids nurse for two weeks, and then take the kids away at night.  I will milk her first thing in the morning, and let the kids back in with her for the day.   I got the idea from fiasco farms website.  Anyway, I have been practicing milking a little (just a few squirts) to get the hang if it, but what I have collected I have fed to our bottle baby buckling (future herd sire).  Yesterday, I got the great idea to try a taste of the milk...hmmm, it did not taste like fresh goat milk, more like funky milk.  I was like ahhh, I can't let my hubby taste this!  He would never try it again and say I told you so!  Can't happen, I am way too invested in this, it has to work.  She is on alfalfa hay right now, and when I am really milking her I was planning on giving her grain at the stand.  She has been wormed recently (a few days after kidding).  The alfalfa is second crop, and maybe not the "best", I struggle to find really pretty hay around here.  If I buy a batch without mold, I consider it a blessing.  I don't think the rain worked with the farmers well last year.  Is it just too early to milk yet?  Any other thoughts?  Thanks
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Rockytopsis
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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2016, 12:23:14 PM »

My first thought is how did you handle the milk you tasted?
Rocky
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A & N Lazy Pond Farm, a small Boer Goat farm in East Tennessee
Julie H
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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2016, 12:59:51 PM »

If she kidded just 3 days ago you are still getting some colostrum.  Second cut alfalfa should be real good stuff.  Is she near the buck, how is she housed?  Both those things can affect milk flavor too.  If she is out eating in a pasture, she could get wild onions among the grass/ browse too.  If milk isn't chilled quickly it can get an off taste, especially goat milk.
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Goshen goaties
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2016, 01:27:52 PM »

Sorry, I meant last week Tuesday, not 3 days ago Tuesday.  We have her in a stall in the barn still, with only access to alfalfa.  The stall has straw over the floor, and has been spot cleaned with new straw added.   I milked maybe 1/2 cup, straight into the stainless steel milk bucket (after sqirting a few squirts into a throw out cup).  Then I went in, strained it with a brand new filter and stuck it in the freezer to cool quickly, and tasted it after about 6 minutes or so.  I just wanted a small taste.  It wasn't ice cold yet when I tasted it, but I thought it should taste the same,  just not as cold.  The only Buck we have right now is our 4 week old buckling, and he is in the stall with her and the two kids.  I am going to introduce them all into the big pen outside this weekend (it is all dirt out there, no plants).  She is  discharging the post pregnancy stuff, could her hormones be out of whack?  The hay is not the bright green sweet smelling stuff, but it dosent smell bad either. 
« Last Edit: April 08, 2016, 01:36:10 PM by Goshen goaties » Logged
dragonlair
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2016, 09:40:02 PM »

It takes some does longer to totally rid their udder of colostrum.

Give it a few days and try again. Wash the udder with warm water or baby wipes and dry it. Squirt the first few squirts into a separate container and dump it. Then milk her into a sanitized pail, immediately cool it and try tasting it again.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2016, 05:11:33 AM »

I agree with the others...on the milk issue.  If you just wormed her a week ago, some of those wormers takes like 30 days to come out of the system and be able to drink the milk, maybe the wormer has it tainted a little?  Our Cows we milked within the second week of calving.  But, here's my thoughts on this...might not be worth two cents, but I'm taking the chance any way.  We found with our cows, and with what goats we milked, the grain made the milk taste a little better. 

I do know that I've heard several folks here in the forum speak about the grazing/foraging the milk goats do, that taints the milk, but you say that you have her in a barn only receiving alfalfa hay...which that cut of hay is best in my opinion.  But it isn't if it's molded or on the edge of molding for sure. 

Hows your Does body condition?  Is she holding good body condition with nursing babies and producing milk?  Grain helps them hold body condition and produce good milk. 
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~ Birdie ~
Goshen goaties
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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2016, 10:14:16 AM »

So I read somewhere that it is good to worm after they kid, because they are low in their resistance.  Is that not a good idea?  I used a pelleted goat wormer, I will read on the back a little closer and see if it has a certain milking time.  Didn't even think of that, silly me.  How much grain is the right amount?  I've herd that too much grain will ruin their rummin, or is that only for grain as their main diet ie:market weathers?  She seems to have about the same body condition as before she kidded, but she has always been on the thinner side since I got her.  I figured it was because she has had several batches of kids, been milked routinely by her previous owner, and is a little older.  My other goats look great, but they are going to be first fresheners,  and are almost two without ever having kidded before.  They all get the same treatment, and she has even received better the last three weeks getting all her  food to herself, plus extra.  Not grain yet though, so I  will start introducing that now before I start milking her, and see if that helps with the flavor too.
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Julie H
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« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2016, 01:43:43 PM »

So I read somewhere that it is good to worm after they kid, because they are low in their resistance.  Is that not a good idea?  I used a pelleted goat wormer, I will read on the back a little closer and see if it has a certain milking time.  Didn't even think of that, silly me.  How much grain is the right amount?  I've herd that too much grain will ruin their rummin, or is that only for grain as their main diet ie:market weathers?  She seems to have about the same body condition as before she kidded, but she has always been on the thinner side since I got her.  I figured it was because she has had several batches of kids, been milked routinely by her previous owner, and is a little older.  My other goats look great, but they are going to be first fresheners,  and are almost two without ever having kidded before.  They all get the same treatment, and she has even received better the last three weeks getting all her  food to herself, plus extra.  Not grain yet though, so I  will start introducing that now before I start milking her, and see if that helps with the flavor too.

I always deworm the day of/after they kid.  The stress of delivery can cause the worms to really get going.   What breed of goat is this?  If a large breed I would start at 1 cup a day on the grain.  I personally prefer a sweet feed and I add alfalfa pellets and this year I am adding calf manna as well ( 1/4 cup each) . I have Boer does and some of them need a large amount of grain when they are feeding their kids ( especially triplets) It really makes a difference in some keeping their condition.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2016, 03:17:52 PM »

I only deworm after I fecal.

Certain plants can make the milk taste funny....pine for one. I have had some funny tasting ice cream after I made it with milk the day after I fed the goats a bunch of pine boughs. Yummy Mocha Pine ice cream! lol

Yup, worm meds can cause an off taste also. The actual med usually is eliminated quickly, but the carrier tends to linger in the system and cause a funny taste.

Grain will only cause rumen problems if you feed large quantities with very little hay. You need long stem hay or buffer the rumen. The amount of grain you feed depends on what type, how much milk she is producing, and her body type. There really isn't a one amount for all does. You can slowly start feeding your grain, gradually increasing the amount until she starts to gain some weight. Once you find the best amount, stay at that amount until she starts getting too fat.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2016, 05:27:19 AM »

I see you used a pelleted goat wormer.  I will tell you that stuff has been proven to not work well on goats.  I would discard that stuff and use something like ...

Dectomax (safe for use in pregnant and nursing goats and kids at the age of 4 weeks and up)..dose 1cc per 50lbs of body weight, wait 10 days and re-dose.

Ivomec (injectable, Ivermectrin horse paste wormer)...Ivomec injectable dosed at 1cc per 50lbs of body weight Ivermectrin horse paste wormer dose double to triple their body weight--example: if your Doe weighs 100lbs, dose at 200 to 300lbs on the tube.  Re-dose again in 10 to 14 days.  Safe for pregnant or nursing Does, and kids of the age of 6 weeks and up.

Cydectin Sheep/goat drench (Safe for pregnant and nursing Does, and kids over the age of 6 weeks) Dose at 1cc per 11lbs of body weight, re-dose again in 14 days.

All three of these wormers are very safe for goats and do kill worms.  However they do have a milk withdrawal time, each one is different so you'd have to read how long before you could consume the milk.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2016, 03:07:17 PM »

Dectomax is awesome.

I use Cydectin pour on orally. When I had only a few goats, I used Quest equine gel, which is cydectin. The Quest gel is dosed at 1cc per 100 pounds. It's much stronger than the cydectin.

Those pellets are pretty much worthless.  Angry
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Goshen goaties
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« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2016, 09:14:54 PM »

Ahh, good to know!  When we bought some of our goats the bag came with them.  I guess I don't even have the pellets anymore anyway, when i went to look for the bag i couldnt find it.  Come to find out, my four year old and his friend fed what was left of the bag too the horses...oops.  Not helpful, glad it didn't kill them!  Note to self, don't store medicines that look like grain by the horse grain. Embarrassed  Anywhoo.  The guy down at the feed store trys to sell me dietamaecous earth for the worms in all of my critters.  Does anyone have experience with that?  I will try those other wormers you guys suggested and maybe even get fecal tests done on the herd.  How does fecal testing work anyway?  Do you just catch some of the droppings in a baggy and mark which animal it came from then take it to the vet?
      Dragonlair, you should market that pine ice cream to the tree hugger crowd.  They might like that because they love trees so much.  You could make a fortune! Grin Wink 

Thanks for the worming tips.
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2016, 05:37:10 AM »

Do not use Ditamaecous Earth...that stuff doesn't work either.  Now it works great on the grounds/pastures for sure...but not ingested.  We tried that one year with devastating results.  One of our goats got hook worms so badly it was a battle trying to save her.  With hookworms, you have to treat the land as well, and that costed us over 1000.00 to do that.  D.E. is ok to kill lice and mites topically, or to use on the land and in the barn area, but that's about all it's good for.  Used as a wormer, worthless!  If you do use that, wear a mask, as that stuff will harm your lungs something awful.

Fecal testing is easy...just like running a worm test on your dog...they take a sample of the manure and test it, and identify which worms, if any, that they have and what de-wormer is best to use to kill it.  A regular maintenance of de-worming helps to keep all this at bay and no infestations will occur.  Now I know lots of folks thinks I'm crazy for this, but I worm my goats every 3 months, the same as I worm our horses, and our cattle.  Our dogs are wormed every month with a heart worm medication (Ivomec).  Now that I am on virgin grounds, I am able to go to worming every 6 months and when I do that, I also give the copper bolus treatments.  With our extremely wet spring here, with flood waters and such, we have wormed every 3 months.  Hot wet damp areas will infest the grounds with worms.  Over stocked areas will also cause worm issues.  Short grasses/forage will have them eating closer to the ground and again, they will pick up worms from that.  But any way, the fecal testing, is just a few pebbles taken in and having tested.  You don't have to take every goats sample, just two or three, more if it's a large herd, or if goats aren't all in the same pasture area.  If one has it, its most guaranteed that they will all have it.

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