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Topic: drought  (Read 709 times)
dragonlair
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« on: September 08, 2016, 09:33:21 AM »

While you all down south are slopping thru all that rain and floods and all, up here in usually wet Maine we have having a drought. I guess it's our turn.

My hay guy managed to get his years worth of hay (he has 2 customers and only hays 1 or 2 fields) in early on. One of his fields is the old grammar school land. It's mostly river clay (from millions of years ago when the Kennebec River was young) so it retains moisture when other soils dry up. Good in drought, bad in our normally wet years. It's also good for usually growing all those yummy weeds my goats LOVE. This years it's mostly grass that the horses love but the goats-not so much. Roll Eyes tongue He usually can't get into his fields until late July/early August in a good year. This makes for a variety of weeds mixed in the hay, but a lower protein. That's fine, I feed grain year round anyway and can easily make up the protein %.

However, other farms have not fared so well and hay is scarce. Because hay is going to be scarce and hard to come by, no one is buying goats. I have 7 of this years kids that need to go. The dealer is buying, and that will be where 3 of these breeding quality mini bucklings will end up, along with the 4th who is pet or meat quality. The 3 doelings- 1 Mini Oberhasli and 2 standard Lamanchas- will end up staying because I refuse to ship them to slaughter.

I'm stressing out trying to figure out how I am going to feed and house all these goats this winter. The soon to be yearlings (6 in all now) can go into the old mini horse stall but I was going to use that for 2017 kids that will be pulled and bottle fed. The barn that seemed so huge when we built it, is now suddenly way too small! Scared

Sigh
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
nancy d
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N.W. WA


« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2016, 11:43:09 AM »

I hear you. Same problem every year here as far as numbers go.
There are 3 young does going to our lawn guy for meat. One has double fish teats & is too darn sweet for her own good. All buck kids are gone thank God.
In 16 yrs there has never been fish teats, it must be Cal even though he is clean.
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Julie H
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Missouri


« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2016, 01:21:05 PM »

It seems that we either get too wet or not enough.  There is no hay or there is hay needing to be cut and no dry days to put it up.  Are the goat prices holding up well at auction there?  I have thankfully not yet ever had to take my girls there, but my boys go next week.  Prices here are in the mid-upper $2's per pound so we don't fare too badly.  If things pick up and you get rain soon will your hay guy be able to cut later this fall?
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dragonlair
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2016, 11:24:26 PM »

Goat prices are down because no one is buying. We only have 1 auction, kind of a skanky place, so not sure what the prices are. I am, hopefully, going to have a dealer buy these 4 bucklings. He ships out of state, so he gives a better price. I haven't shipped excess bucks in a couple of years or more, so not sure what the prices are.

My hay guy only puts up 1 cutting a year. He has a super busy construction business with more work than he has time to do it. He is so very honest and does incredible work, that he is in high demand. His son's have grown up and moved on with life, so he doesn't even have his boys to help out any more. They stayed until the hay was in and then left. (military, college etc)
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2016, 05:09:22 AM »

Oh man...last year when we had that drought, it was God awful getting hay.  Typically hay season is a long season down here.  Cutting way into October.  But this year, with all the flood rains...hay fields if they can get into them, is flattened by the rushing water.  Just flat a bad year all over the country.  I don't know the going rate on goats at market down here, but I do know that Pygmy's and Nigi's are bring 200.00 at 8 weeks old.  Now that blows my mind...unregistered even.  I remember the day I bought young yearling adult pygmys for 24.00 to 50.00 each.  Gotta love the Pygmy.. Smiley 

I hope you find Hay Deb.  I need to make a trip and get a few more bales for mine.  One never knows when you won't be able to get it any more.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Missouri


« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2016, 01:21:16 PM »

Goat prices are down because no one is buying. We only have 1 auction, kind of a skanky place, so not sure what the prices are. I am, hopefully, going to have a dealer buy these 4 bucklings. He ships out of state, so he gives a better price. I haven't shipped excess bucks in a couple of years or more, so not sure what the prices are.

In MN I had a dealer who would come and get any kids I couldn't sell on my own.  What was nice was that he would give me what the current market price was for that day and the sales he went to paid really good prices.  I always got a good price and I didn't have to haul them anywhere.  He was a nice guy too.

The sale we now haul to has several good buyers who are there every week, so the prices for sheep & goats stays higher than at the more shady type places.
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imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2016, 05:08:56 AM »

Julie what sale barn are you selling at?  Southwest City?
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Julie H
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Missouri


« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2016, 01:10:08 PM »

Julie what sale barn are you selling at?  Southwest City?

We sell at the auction in Mexico MO.  I think it is Midwest Exchange Regional Auction. Takes about 1 1/2 hours but it is a nice drive and I don't get out much.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2016, 02:58:35 PM »

My hay dealer has enough hay he said. If not, I have a friend who has about 100 bales of small square bales I can get if needed later in the season.

Up here we typically don't get to start haying until July with MAYBE a second cut in August or Sept. Guys who do the baleage can cut and bale it right up to snow fall.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2016, 04:29:13 AM »

Julie what sale barn are you selling at?  Southwest City?

We sell at the auction in Mexico MO.  I think it is Midwest Exchange Regional Auction. Takes about 1 1/2 hours but it is a nice drive and I don't get out much.

Yep that's the best auction barn in the state for goats.  The other really good auction barn in Missouri is in Southwest City.  I have several friends and we have several members of the forum here who do sell in Mexico Missouri.

My hay dealer has enough hay he said. If not, I have a friend who has about 100 bales of small square bales I can get if needed later in the season.

Up here we typically don't get to start haying until July with MAYBE a second cut in August or Sept. Guys who do the baleage can cut and bale it right up to snow fall.

I'm seeing more and more baleage down here as well.  Which is a good sign for cattle ranchers.  It's good stuff for cattle, but no so much for goats.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
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Posts: 9376



« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2016, 09:08:38 PM »

Or horses.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Julie H
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Posts: 1569


Missouri


« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2016, 01:17:08 PM »

Julie what sale barn are you selling at?  Southwest City?

We sell at the auction in Mexico MO.  I think it is Midwest Exchange Regional Auction. Takes about 1 1/2 hours but it is a nice drive and I don't get out much.

Yep that's the best auction barn in the state for goats.  The other really good auction barn in Missouri is in Southwest City.  I have several friends and we have several members of the forum here who do sell in Mexico Missouri.



My hay dealer has enough hay he said. If not, I have a friend who has about 100 bales of small square bales I can get if needed later in the season.

Up here we typically don't get to start haying until July with MAYBE a second cut in August or Sept. Guys who do the baleage can cut and bale it right up to snow fall.

I'm seeing more and more baleage down here as well.  Which is a good sign for cattle ranchers.  It's good stuff for cattle, but no so much for goats.



Is baleage where they cut it and the bale and bag it a few hours later?   Seeing more of that here too.  Some do feed it to horses, but I never would.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2016, 01:27:38 PM by Julie H » Logged
dragonlair
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Posts: 9376



« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2016, 03:48:44 PM »

Yup. Up here they cut it one day. Rake it the next morning and then bale it. It is the wrapped in air tight wrap after baling. It makes hay silage. If you know the plastic has not been ripped, you can feed it to horses or goats, but you can't always tell if it has been ripped.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19205


Texas


« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2016, 05:16:31 AM »

it's risky to feed to horses, goats, and sheep.  Hogs love it though...it's a good filler for them in the winter months, helps keep them warmer.  Cattle do very well on it.   I'm too fearful of mold to risk it with the other animals.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
Herdmaster
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Posts: 9376



« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2016, 03:29:05 PM »

I just sold my bucklings to the dealer. Up here the going price is 1.00 a pound. Next year, if someone wants a kid they will have to put a deposit on it before I will hold them. All 4 of these bucklings and one of the doelings were "spoken for" and then the "buyers" decided not to show up. I cancelled the ads for them and everything. I took a big loss on the kids this year because of it.  Angry Angry Angry Angry Angry
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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