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| | |-+  Injured baby goat
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Topic: Injured baby goat  (Read 545 times)
Jan
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Posts: 428


Central CA. Boers, Nubian, Alpine


« on: June 15, 2017, 12:23:34 PM »

I thought about posting this in corrals/housing but I guess it's better posted here. Nothing can be done at this point, I'm waiting on the vet.
 
We have 'clamshells' for some shade/houses. These are mounted on top of semi-trucks to help wind-resistance. We've had this one for approx 3 years. Apparently it had a crack and when the baby jumped on it, the cracked opened and the baby's leg went into the crack and the crack closed on his leg. Think 'peeling the meat' off a chicken bone.

We had to break away some of l the fiberglass to get to the baby, minimal blood loss but I doubt the leg can be saved. Currently baby is resting quietly on backyard patio, but needs a humam with him to keep him from trying to get up.

The clamshells were great shade/windbreaks, and now I need to find an alternative.

 I'm always in awe (and not in a good way) at what goats can do to get in trouble, like baby Pygmy Lincoln drowning in a water barrel. Now I've removed all the barrels from the pens and they had worked well for us.

And last year the wooden houses I built for birthing areas had openings that I suspect were too narrow. (I'm blaming these openings on contributing to our horrible baby loss last year - by saying moms laid on them)
« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 12:36:38 AM by Jan » Logged

I don't want to be perfect, I just want to make a difference.
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19071


Texas


« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2017, 12:40:32 PM »

OH my goodness...I do hope the vet finds a way to help him.  Maybe wrapping the leg until the skin/hair grows back in, or the meat heals up.  Hold hope until told otherwise.  And I'll be praying for him.  I'm so sorry this has happened.  I know your heart is hurting. (((((((((((hugs))))))))))))
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~ Birdie ~
Jan
Caprine Guru
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Posts: 428


Central CA. Boers, Nubian, Alpine


« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2017, 01:32:38 PM »

He's got great genetics. His grandfather won some awards. The stud owner (10 yrs old) didn't want grandpa's gene's all over the county, but we used his son's.
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I don't want to be perfect, I just want to make a difference.
Julie H
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Posts: 1501


Missouri


« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2017, 01:34:33 PM »

Here is hoping it isn't as bad as it looks.
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nancy d
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Posts: 5926

N.W. WA


« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2017, 02:30:21 PM »

They can bounce back from incredible accidents. Maybe some banamine for any pain?
Keep an eye on his temp too.
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19071


Texas


« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2017, 05:07:08 AM »

Jan, what was the outcome from the vets visit?  I do hope the little fella is ok.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2017, 10:54:43 AM »

I've seen horses and dogs with the skin peeled totally away (tails on dogs, skin on legs of horses etc) and the animal came right back after that injury. The trick was to keep the area bandaged and moist with a water soluble antibiotic cream (or coconut oil based) like furacin, changing it every other day.

I am fully convinced that goats are born with one goal in life- to commit suicide. You could put them in a padded cell and they would STILL figure some way to harm/kill themselves. Angry Angry Sad Sad

Good luck with your little dude.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Jan
Caprine Guru
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Posts: 428


Central CA. Boers, Nubian, Alpine


« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2017, 12:20:34 PM »

The new intern is the vet that came out. He said the foot felt cold to him. Baby got Excede, tetanus booster, Banamine, and left us with 3 more doses of Banamine. We loosely wrapped the leg to keep dirt out with instructions to change dressing 2x a day.

I can see bone in all directions, and he drags that leg (front right). But he is in good spirits and still wants his loving. I'll try every chance God gives him even if it means on 3 legs.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 12:38:15 AM by Jan » Logged

I don't want to be perfect, I just want to make a difference.
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19071


Texas


« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2017, 06:19:39 AM »

Oh goodness...is the leg broken? 

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~ Birdie ~
Jan
Caprine Guru
****
Posts: 428


Central CA. Boers, Nubian, Alpine


« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2017, 04:28:15 PM »

Difficult to look at.
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I don't want to be perfect, I just want to make a difference.
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19071


Texas


« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2017, 06:34:28 AM »

If you can keep infection out of that, and keep it from being injured again (even minor injury--won't be easy with a baby), I think that will heal up.  We definitely want that to heal from the inside out.  To prevent proud flesh it will need to do that.  If proud flesh grows (meaning it heals from the outside in), it would need to be reopened, and the proud flesh cut away.  It will take a lot of work, but I think you can definitely heal this little fella.

Some tips of things you can try to get that healed up with is...
squirting straight Penicillin into the wound 2 times daily.
applying and packing the wound with Furazone antibiotic ointment 2 times daily.
Flushing it with betadine solution once or twice daily.

Now, I would definitely keep him on penicillin (you can give it orally) at least once a daily for 14 days.  Your greatest fear with this is the infection.  If you start him on antibiotic (orally or injected) we'll need to keep him on a probiotic (that's a must as young as he is), and a little b-complex (also can be given orally), both those once daily. 

If we can help you with any thing...let us know...thanks for posting the picture of it...that really helps us to help you.  Poor fella...that's a major ouchie.
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Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1501


Missouri


« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2017, 01:06:04 PM »

That is awful looking for sure.  I think it will heal too as long as you can keep the flies out and infection at bay.  Animals have an amazing ability to heal from the worst wounds.  Is he bearing any weight on it now?
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Jan
Caprine Guru
****
Posts: 428


Central CA. Boers, Nubian, Alpine


« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2017, 02:46:13 PM »

And the underside looks just as bad, if not worse. When we remove the old dressing, we spray a veterinary wound cleaner, then pack with Neosporin (or equivalent). The vet left us with a batting-type padding and 'sports-wrap'.

The vet will come back tomorrow for another long-acting antibiotic and, I hope, more Banamine since he got his last one this morning.

When we remove the dressing, I notice an odor, but injury isn't red or inflamed.

'Peg-leg Pete' still wants his loving, eats grain and alfalfa, and nurses when his mom stands still long enough. So unless something changes, he's worth saving.

What are the challenges of having a goat who is missing a limb?
« Last Edit: June 18, 2017, 02:49:26 PM by Jan » Logged

I don't want to be perfect, I just want to make a difference.
Jan
Caprine Guru
****
Posts: 428


Central CA. Boers, Nubian, Alpine


« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2017, 02:52:26 PM »

No weight on it, he acts like he's dragging a dead appendage.

He's about 6 weeks old and close to 30 lbs.
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I don't want to be perfect, I just want to make a difference.
dragonlair
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 9269



« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2017, 04:43:26 PM »

I worked construction for a while and one of the places we were remodeling at was a rescue. She had 2 adult goats with only 3 legs and they did great. One was missing a front leg, one a rear leg. One was born with a defective leg that had to be removed and the other lost its leg as an older kid/young adult. To see these 2 be-bopping around, you would never think they were moving on 3 legs. One was a huge Alpine, the other was an equally large Nubian or Boer crossed with a Saanen.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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