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Topic: Bye, bye babies!  (Read 487 times)
dragonlair
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Posts: 9468



« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2017, 12:02:01 PM »

The good thing about this buckling is that he is not related to any of my does except for his dam and sister. The sister hasn't started cycling yet and the dam is way too tall for him to reach.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Julie H
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Posts: 1600


Missouri


« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2017, 01:22:42 PM »

If I am unlucky enough to have any "oops" this year,  I am thinking it would be Cindy Lou's boy as he was actually marking himself at the end.  He isn't related to any of my does but his mother. Lots of chasing going on but nobody was standing still and the young boys were easily sidetracked  Smiley

Good idea about the hoop house Birdie.  I am just planning on banding from now on.  No matter how nice my boys are I don't seem to have the market here with individual buyers like I did in MN..
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cbdale
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Posts: 295


« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2017, 06:06:16 PM »

Man, I have debated upon banding my two Genemasters; however, they are too nice!!  I wish I could place all my bucks into one acre pasture, with barn, but I am afraid one will get severely hurt.  Always something.  I wish I had only gotten females to start with. Learning the hard way.  About time to get out of the goats!!
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19332


Texas


« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2017, 05:38:21 AM »

That is one thing I learned the hard way...Boer bucks, they don't play very nice with one another at all.  Our Genemaster and our Kiko's got along great with one another, but put a Boer around them and all h*ll would break loose.  This is why I blamed the bloodlines so much.  I have seen folks put their boer bucks together and do just fine.  I think our Timmy Buck was just a mean mean buck.  BoCephus was never given the chance to be mean.  He had his own Pen, which was huge so I should call it a "lot" instead of a "pen".  BoCephus, he had always been with other bucks, and so had Roady (my Kiko buck).  Roady, Prince and Tad did extremely well together, and so did Oberon, Rusty and Silver (Rusty and Silver were bucks from Brick which was Taddy's daddy and Oberon was Princes daddy)...all those bucks played nicely with one another, but Timmy...that boy was just the meanest animal I had ever met in my life, and the only animal on earth that I ever "hated".

We just decided it was better to put the bucks in a pen/lot by themselves and not have them on joining fence lines.  We were lucky enough to have the land to do that with.  The weanling buck pen, all the weanlings were together until they were sold.  We didn't band any boys, not even the ones who wouldn't make good sires....the 4 bucklings we took to the sale barn were inbred, so they went for slaughter, but I would have sold them as wethers if someone would have wanted them, but I wasn't selling them for sires with my name on them.  But I have noticed, that they do sell better at the sale barn if they are intact. 

I so wish we were back on the farm in Pea Ridge.  I so wish I still had all my goats. 
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Posts: 1600


Missouri


« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2017, 01:15:44 PM »

Sale barn prices here are the same for wethers or intact bucks so I am lucky there.  All go by weight so as long as they are looking good they bring the top price.
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cbdale
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Posts: 295


« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2017, 02:43:46 PM »

I have been careful with my bucks,  as I have had a request to breed him(Kiko) to several Spanish does, where he had purchased from a farm in Texas, and I was suspicious of their health, as he was told the Spanish did not need feet trimmed, or have worm problems.   Today, he told me he had lost 35 of his herd to worms.  I am glad I did not let them into my pasture. You have to think of your pastures, when you let in unknown goats health.  I am sure it was barber pole worms that he stated.  He was feeding a cow feed of 15%, and I am sure the copper content was too low. There are two mfg of feed in this county, and both that have goat feed are very low in copper.  I find that I have to bolus at least 3 times a year, to keep my goats looking good. Some will not listen, and suffer the consequences.  I don't feed no ugly goat!!!!  yehaw
  Pam, the ideal of using the cattle panels ( 4ft x 16ft)is a good way for a shelter for goats.  Lay a 2x6 on each side of panel on ground 12 feet long, and a metal field post at each end of the panel, on each side, attach with zip ties to hold , then bend the panel into a loop to other side of the 2x6, and 3 panels will make a good 12 ft long shelter. I would buy a heavy tarp longer than 16ft, and fold at one end for closure.  I think about 9 ft wide should hold up fine, and keep goats from climbing on top.  You could make a 2x4 frame at front to make a door if needed, and to support the middle.  The 4x4 square, 16ft panels will be stronger. Most use the regular cattle panels--just do not spread too wide apart, as the closer make more stronger. I order the heavy duty, grey tarps on internet.
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cbdale
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Posts: 295


« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2017, 02:47:13 PM »

Hey Pam, I forgot to ask about your condition after the water?  I notice not much has been on news, after good reports about how Trump reacted.  Now, it is all negative about Trump being too slow in PRico.  The Dem's only have negative agenda against Trump, and not how to make our country great again. How can one vote for a Democrat again?
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19332


Texas


« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2017, 05:55:42 AM »

I didn't use the cattle panel for our hoop hut, because I didn't have one.  I stopped buying those a long time ago.  I use the 4x4 goat panels for every thing now.  I stopped using the field fencing as well, and went strictly with the goat fencing.  That fencing stretches so nice and tight and stays that way.  We were impressed by that fencing and the way it held up when Hurricane Ike came up out of the gulf and hit us in Arkansas and put several trees down on our fencing..big huge trees..Walnut trees that were at least 5' around, Oak trees that the smallest was 12" around...and not one strand, not one fence bent or broke.  That's a top quality fence that will withstand that brutality.

I've only had to use 1 Hoop hut for my goats, and that was with Wittle Weedle.  He was being raised for a herd sire for my good friends in Missouri.  So he was kept intact.  He was a 100% NZ Kiko, and out of some awesome bloodlines.  He produced some really super nice kids with tons of color (tri's and bi's), and one with blue eyes.  These friends of mine also had my bloodline from my farm in Pea Ridge.  So they already had the blue eye genetic in their Does. 

Our hoop hut, I built by myself...I attached the corners to steel fence posts.  I used a heavy duty industrial tarp, that I ordered online.  It was big enough to enclose the back side as well as the hoop itself.  So he had 3 sides enclosed.  I left a small portion of the tarp draped over the front entrance to shield off sun and weather conditions.  It worked really good for one baby goat.  I put a pallet in their for flooring and covered it with a scrap piece of plywood, and then put shavings in on top of that.  He was plenty comfortable.  His pen was built from 4x4 goat panels as well.  So he had a 16x16 pen.  Plenty big enough for a baby goat.  Wouldn't suggest that for adult or teenage goats for a long period of time.  Would need it bigger than that.

Charles it sounds to me like your friend got some extremely bad advice.  I started our venture years ago with Spanish goats.  Didn't keep them very long.  Couldn't keep them behind a fence, they could jump any thing I used.  Came home one day and found one of them on top of our house.  Don't even ask me how that bugger got up there.  After we got him down, they all went to the sale barn.  They are beautiful animals, but too hard to keep behind fences.
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~ Birdie ~
cbdale
Caprine Guru
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Posts: 295


« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2017, 08:23:19 AM »

You are a smart lady, and I am sure your spouse is aware.  I did not use all 4x4 panels due to price; however, I wish they were all such.  Yes, the goat fence here is 4x4 as well, and is what I will use if I put up some more fence.  I tried to tell the guy that all goats have to be properly fed, and managed for best results, and I am amazed how they think all feed is the same, just the % protein.  He was feeding a 15% cow feed, which was I am sure not formulated for goats.  The copper %,  amd some cattle feed may have urea in formula( not good for goats), and the recommended 20 to 25 ppm of copper is not enough for my goats, and I bolus according to how they look as to coat, and tail.

 I am wary in some mfg of feed, as I saw one in town where the rats were galore, and they shot them with rat shot on weekends.  Think what was in the feed you fed your goats.  Too much chance of a disease.
  I am going to make a 12 ft shelter with 3 of the 4ft, 4x4 panels, 16 ft long, for strength, and to hold up to snow and weather, as you mentioned in last post. The 4x4 panels, here are around $50 a panel, but are worth it for it's strength. I build mine just as you described, and I make an elevated bed off the ground to let any rain water pass under.  It works well, and the last 12 x12 wood shelter I made for my donkeys, cost me about a grand, as the 2x6, and 2x8's , 4x6 main post, and metal top , were not cheap.  My barn was made of the real oak, where the 2x4, was a 2x4, and the 2x6 were heavy timber. The oak is so hard , I have to drill a hold to place a nail.  I have only had to replace a couple of corner posts of barn, and I rebraced several places that only toe-nailed around the posts.  I am OCD for sure, and I wanted it to stand.  It is solid now, and the idiot that build the barn, built in a low area for water to run under the framing. It was built for cows, and will outlast me. I have a nice, head holder for cows, and the long panels that make a run.  I wish a goat could be used in the head hold; however, the horns are in the way.
 Time to feed---I tried some Duhmor (TSC) feed, and it has more fat than the Noble (2%), and the moms are getting too fat.  I think I will reduce my feed to moms, as their kids are about to be weaned. 
 Have a good day, and may God keep His Hand upon you, and yours.   My keyboard is driving me crazy, as we went to all wireless, and this board skips all the time.
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19332


Texas


« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2017, 06:41:44 AM »

Oh man, I know that oak is hard to work with...we built our barn in Arkansas out of roughen sawn oak...OMG, that was murder on saws, saw blades, drills and nails.  Next time you do it Charles, we learned a trick with the oak...take some used motor oil (free at any shop that changes motor oil), paint the wood with the oil before you work with it.  Let it soak in for about an hour, then have a go at it.  We did that and stopped breaking drill bits (we used screws on all our wood instead of nails, nails bent and broke with oak), wearing out those expensive saw blades and over heating our saws.  Works like a charm, and it protects the wood from insects and termites.  No boar bee will ever chew on oil treated wood.  Anyway, this saves you a lot of hard labor and stress.  My daddy did that to all the hard woods that he worked with, and I made the suggestion to my hubby when we were building our barn and he didn't do it at first, but then I tried it on one 2x6x12 and it went through it like butter...so he adopted it and we finished the barn that way.  Before we put a screw into the wood, we also dipped the tip of the screw into a little oil and it drilled in like butter.  Try it some time.  laugh
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~ Birdie ~
cbdale
Caprine Guru
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Posts: 295


« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2017, 08:41:16 AM »

Yes, that is like tap-magic for drilling into metals.  I need to paint my oak barn with the oil, as the boer bees are bad in summer.
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