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Topic: Diarrhea, weight loss, pumpkin UPDATE  (Read 293 times)
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1657


Missouri


« on: August 27, 2018, 12:37:49 PM »

I just wanted to say that Pumpkin is a lie saver!

I had a doe who suddenly was having puddle like stools, where it was running down her legs and stuck to her tail.  Her weight plummented literally overnight.  She was a bit thin already from nursing 2 kids so her change was shocking.

I started out using Pepto which helped some but not like I had hoped.  She was still wanting to eat thankfully, but was like a skeleton in like 2 days.

So I went to the " health info pages "  here and tried pumpkin .  It worked almost immediately!! I used the canned first but went to what we cooked and put in our freezer from the garden.

  I was worried there for a few days as she was so terribly thin.

 I am giving her a little pumpkin each morning along with a dose of jumpstart ( i think its called)  vit/ min gel with probiotics.  I have also hit her with 3 different classes of dewormers ( done gently when dosing thin animals).

I have no idea what caused her diarrhea?  It was green ( no smell)  and they have been in the same field now since the dry spell.

I am happy to say that I can see that she has started gaining weight, her appetite is good and I sold her kids so no nursing  Grin
« Last Edit: September 18, 2018, 01:34:25 PM by Julie H » Logged
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19402


Texas


« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2018, 06:10:40 AM »

Pumpkin is my "go to" for any type of stomach upset.  Even if it's nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, what ever.  We have found with Shanes diverticulitis that pumpkin helps to soothe those horrific pains.  Though its not a cure, it does seriously help.

I use pumpkin on my dogs as well as I did on my goats.  It works wonders. 

I'm so glad to hear that she cleared up so quickly and is gaining weight back now.  I wonder with the green diarrhea, that's a food induced diarrhea, if she got a hold of a weed that maybe wasn't so good for them.  I had that happen back home in AR, and I couldn't for the life of me figure it out.  Come to find out, a neighboring Cattle rancher came over with the same problem with his cattle, during a drought no less, and come to find out it was a weed called "peppermint"...it's a purplish colored weed, with green under the leaves, and it spreads like wild fire...and believe it or not, it's toxic to goats and cattle...now we pulled by hand the amount we had, but our neighbor had to actually spray his fields to kill it.  I have another friend in Missouri (California), and they had the same issue, the same year we had it, and again she discovered this Peppermint weed in her cattles pasture up under the shaded woody area and that's where the cattle had been hanging out due to the heat and drought.  Check your shady areas...see if that minty smelling purplish green weed is there.  The seeds to that weed isn't toxic, but the plant itself is.

I hope your girl continues to improve and do well, but I'm absolutely positive that she will under your care.  Good Job Julie.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1657


Missouri


« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2018, 01:30:34 PM »

We were just in there cutting Polk Berry down and I didn't see anything like you describe.   Now that we have had rain my big pasture is reviving and they should be able to go out there again soon and let theirs rebound a bit.

She is the only one and I have 30 goats out there.  Maybe she just has some digestive issue? Maybe due to the heat?  I hope she continues to improve too  Smiley   I am doing all I know how and she is perky and eating so that is a good sign.
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dragonlair
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Posts: 9519



« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2018, 03:28:09 PM »

The weed Pam was describing is Polk weed, so maybe you have your answer, Julie!
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19402


Texas


« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2018, 05:27:23 AM »

No, Deb, Julie...the weed I'm speaking of isn't polk berry.  This weed is a low growing weed, maybe gets about a foot and half tall.  It's purplish colored on top of the leaves, and dark green under the leaves.  It smells like peppermint when you cut or pull it.  It will take a field over in a heart beat if you don't get it before it goes to seed.  This weed is toxic to livestock.  I can't remember the true name of it, but Dixie (in California Missouri), she has goats (about 25 head), and 200 head of cattle, and 4 head of Llama's and she lost a cow/calf pair to these weeds, and 2 goats to these weeds.  I was battling them on my farm in AR when she asked about mine, and low and behold it was the same weed I was battling.  My goats didn't eat it, but hers did.  It likes to start growing in shaded areas, such as right along timber lines, but will start where ever it's shadier, like around barns.  Then it takes off and takes over your entire pasture.  I had one goat pasture that was absolutely full of it, and I dug it up, I burned it out, I sprayed it and it kept coming back...so I had to empty that pasture/lot (this one was the birthing pen about 2 acres big) and spray with Remedy to kill it.  Then that had to sit all winter with on goats on it for fear of poisoning from that spray.

This is a very minty smelling weed.  I wish I could recall what it's actually called.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1657


Missouri


« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2018, 12:51:56 PM »

No Birdie I don't have anything like you describe-- thank goodness.

Dragon--  I have seen some eat the young Polk Berry plant leaves and it didn't seem to bother anyone but it takes over so last year we cut all the mature plants down and then came back last week to get the few that came back.  That is a horrible task.  Last year it took us 4 days of chopping and piling the huge plants and we got covered with purple berry stains  Grin

This year it took us about 45 minutes of just cutting tiny plants and letting they lay where they fell.  No blooms or berries either!

2 1/2 inches of rain so far today since 6am  pg  we haven't had a rain like this in months...

My girls is loose stool free 2 days now but I am still giving a little syringe of pumpkin once a day for a while.  Is that ok??
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 12:53:40 PM by Julie H » Logged
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19402


Texas


« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2018, 06:42:59 AM »

Yep Polk berries can get huge and be a royal pain.  Pumpkin is good for goats.  Giving them a little each day won't hurt at all.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1657


Missouri


« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2018, 12:49:53 PM »

That is good to know as I have several who seem to really want a taste of it when I am giving it to Winnie ( as I am mobbed)  Grin
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Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1657


Missouri


« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2018, 01:46:00 PM »

I wanted to update on Winnie.

I got the diarrhea under control and had moved her into the barn and feeding only grass hay.  She was bright eyed and eating hay well and drinking, but had lost so much weight literally overnight due to the diarrhea.  I guess it had taken a toll on her body.  I found her laying down yesterday morning with her head bent into her flank.  I started the thiamine and superB complex, but I lost her  Cry


Last night after dosing her, I looked at her frail body and knew she had gone through way too much already.  I stroked her face ( she closed her eyes in pleasure  as she loved to be petted) and told her it was ok to let go, then prayed to God that if he ever answered any of my prayers to please let it be this one and to take her peacefully.   When I came to do her dosing next she was gone Cry

I know for next time to pen immediately with any runny stool and feed grass hay immediately.  The pumpkin seemed to work so I wasn't as diligent about getting her penned and then when it didn't work and I saw her she was shockingly thin and it was just overnight.  I do blame myself.  A hard, hard lesson to learn.
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19402


Texas


« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2018, 04:53:07 AM »

 Cry Cry  Julie, I'm so sorry for your loss.  You did the right thing, you took good care of her during her life time with you.  There was something else underlying that we just didn't pin point.  God needed her, he answered your prayers...vision her life when she was healthy and happy because she's made whole again, with no sickness, no pain, no weak flesh...she's strong and vibrant in heaven, playing with my Taddy and my Prince.  What a vision I get when I think of that, full of life and vigor, dashing and bouncing through heavens pastures. 

I know you will miss her a great deal...but please don't blame yourself.   Bug Hug
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1657


Missouri


« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2018, 01:10:03 PM »

Thank you Birdie.

I will always remember how she would run over anytime I had a syringe in my hand.  She never needed to be restrained for deworming  Roll Eyes

I had no clue that it was anything other than food induced as it was green and our pastures had rebounded with all the rain.  Her kids had pulled her down a bit but nothing that weaning wouldn't have taken care of ( i sold them at 4 months).

She was never a robust bodied goat anyway even in normal circumstances, but was always healthy up to now.  She was born here so she had a happy secure life at least.

This was a rough year for me goat wise.  Lost 3 adult does and 5 kids.

Hopefully , one I won't experience again anytime soon.

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creekmom
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1057


South Central Texas


« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2018, 01:16:34 PM »

So sorry for your loss.  It's always so hard to lose one.   Cry The worse part of farm life. 

You shouldn't be so hard on yourself.  You took really good care of her and she had a really good life with you.  Up to the very end.  So glad she went so peacefully.      Bug Hug

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Elizabeth
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19402


Texas


« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2018, 06:56:03 AM »

I remember years ago, when SallyP was active, when those unexplained deaths would hit, she would always tell us, "you'll probably never know, but your heart will never forget the love you shared with your goat."

They are hard to wrap your brain around.  Especially when they are so well taken care of.  It was probably a toxic plant that she got a hold of, that slowly worked on her, and took her.  Nightshade can be like that...giving supplemental meds/vitamins can slow the toxins down, but once it's out of the system, it takes back over. 

I can't tell you how sorry I am for your loss. 
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 9519



« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2018, 08:31:53 PM »

So sorry for your loss. Cry
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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