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Topic: Meningeal Worms  (Read 309 times)
MedsHomestead
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« on: October 26, 2018, 01:57:32 PM »

Hi everyone!  Wow it has been quite a year here on the homestead! 

As I posted in another thread, I was forced to downsize - had to sell my beautiful herdsire, my sister-in-law rehomed her 2 does that I took care of for 7 years, my son and Daughter-in-law moved their 3 doelings to their new farm...however I retained my original 2 does and a wether.  Part of the downsizing consisted of moving my 3 goats back to my barn and fencing in a new pasture - instead of the pastures and housing I had them in closer to my brother's house.  Well it has been an adjustment for all of us but last week, my one doe started showing weakness in her hind end - now I thought her sister rammed her pretty hard and hurt her because, she wasn't off her appetite at all, no fever, no mastitis, no problems with her feet, and yet she seems slightly progressively worse each day, until Friday when I got home my husband said she could now barely get up and carry her weigh when she did - then it flashed!  Oh no meningeal worms - new pasture - first time fenced for most of it, a really wet humid summer.  So I did the protocol: no grain, hay and water only  Ivomec and 5 days of Safeguard and Banimin, along with b complex and, thiamine.  After the Safeguard treatment ended I have been continuing the B-complex and thiamine and have added selenium/e gel.

 I am happy to say Rose is coming around.  She can easily get up from resting and last evening she was able to get up on the milk stand again.

She got a scant amount of grain and she wanted to be milked - I wanted to milk her to check for mastitis since we were off our schedule for most of the week.

Her sister is still pretty brutal when they are in the big area together, so I fashioned a "pen" for Rose for overnight so she wasn't forced out of the shelter during the night. (I suspect they aren't a mean to each other when I am not there but just in case...) I am pretty sure Rose will make a full recovery - she is still a little stiff legged when she walks but she wants to be out in the pasture with the other 2 - and she is very interested in my "other" brother's young bucks.  I will be making the decision about breeding her by the end of next month after I see if she recovers, and watch to see if there appears to be a permanent curvature in her spine (so far there is no sign of that)  Anyway, I just wanted to share...I have had more trouble with ticks and parasites this year than ever before and I have been raising goats on and off for about 38 years!  On the up side, I have a very lovely little milk stall with electric lights now so feeding and milking in the dark at both ends of the day is not so traumatic!.
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2018, 02:51:05 PM »

Wow!!!  Meningeal Worm is very very rare in goats and is typically transferred from Deer.  Meningeal worm affects the swallowing and tongue.  I'm surprised she was able to eat and drink.  The deer that died next to our farm in Arkansas were protected from the Pea Ridge Military park (6000 acres of nothing but wooded land in protection as the largest Civil war battle was fought there), they died due to the meningeal worm.  It was at that time I began a deep research into the Meningeal worm, to see if that would affect my goat herd.  Not only did Corneal University, Washington state University and Texas A&M agree that it would be very rare if our goats got it, but so did my Caprine Specialist Vet.  After reading about it and how it's transferred into a herd of Deer, I stopped worrying about the disease spreading through my herd.

I'm so shocked to hear your girl contracted that disease/worm.  I'm very happy to hear that she's surviving it.  That's one deadly worm to get in a goat.  In the rare chance that goats did get the worm, it's a very slim chance that they live through it.

I would most certainly continue the bcomplex and even add the thiamine to it once daily for 4 days and then off for 4 days and back on for 4 more days.  A good probiotic will help as well.  I wouldn't breed her this year at all if I were you..but that's just my opinion.  The meningeal worm is the worlds worst of all.  I wouldn't chance a low immunity system from being pregnant and chance loosing her to another onset.

Sounds like your world is constantly changing and I'll bet you'll be glad to have a normal routine again.  But your milk parlor sounds awesome!!  Baby steps, and one day, those baby steps will find your destination.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 06:50:03 PM »

M-worm is fairly common in areas with heavy populations of white tail deer, like up here in Maine. Not uncommon to have a goat or several in a herd pick up the M-worm. Big doses of Safeguard to kill the worm plus dexamethasone to help with the inflammation in the spinal cord is what we all use to combat it. It can be a long uphill battle, depending on how long and how severe the load is.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2018, 07:58:56 AM »

Then we should have had the threat in Arkansas...with the Military Park connecting our land...but Deb, even Cornell University told me how rare it was/is for a goat to get the M-worm.  I spoke with them a lot on the phone over the period of time that deer were found dead not more than 20 feet from my property line.  We fed the deer on our property to protect them from poaching on the Parks land.  They had 6000 acres of protected property in that park...I would imagine the deer population was very large there.  I know we found 9 dead deer and the game warden came and got them and we were all alerted about the M-worm when the autopsies came back.  But not one of our goats got it.  The deer that were found dead, their tongues were swollen so huge that they couldn't breathe, eat or drink...their throats were gigantic.  I know that comes in the latter stages of the disease, and just before death.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Missouri


« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2018, 01:34:15 PM »

No matter what she had I am glad you were able to treat and save her  Smiley  I wouldn't breed her either.  Maybe wait and breed late Spring for a fall baby??  Give her time to recoup.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2018, 02:31:17 PM »

Well, maybe it's not common down there, but most farms up here have had at least 1 goat dealing with it. I had one many years ago, caught it early on. A lot of people are not so lucky and end up with goats in slings for weeks.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2018, 07:35:29 AM »

It's a terrible thing when a goat gets it.  From what I witnessed of the deaths, I was petrified of what could happen to my goats. 

Julie, I totally agree, I'm happy that Medshomestead caught it early enough to save her.  A happy ending is the Blessing from God.
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~ Birdie ~
MedsHomestead
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2018, 08:05:44 AM »

M-worm is becoming more common around our area - My cousin had a buck he bought off of me several years ago, and by the time he had me come look at him and we got the vet down we lost him.  We have a large whitetail population and this was a virgin pasture - by that I mean I forged through overgrowth that otherwise was untouched except by wildlife - in areas that I found deer and bear scat - I covered with DE and lime.

Thanks for the advice on waiting to bred her - I was pretty sure I was going to wait but it is always good to hear that you're on the right path.

As far as Rosie, she is definitely on the mend.  I have been continuing the b-complex and adding Thiamine - I will continue that 4 on/4 off per Birdies suggestion. I have also been giving her selenium/Vita E paste about 2 times a week.  She is very itchey! but her backend is strong again and she is playful with my wether - but in general she seems more subdued that she ever was before.
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Pat
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« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2018, 11:47:44 PM »

Meds -- You say "around your area" -- where, specifically, are you?

Hoping we don;'t see this!

P
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imalilbirdie
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2018, 05:19:00 AM »

I have also been giving her selenium/Vita E paste about 2 times a week.  She is very itchey! but her backend is strong again and she is playful with my wether - but in general she seems more subdued that she ever was before.

Meds...please be careful giving a lot of the selenium...that can be overdosed, and there is no saving them once it is over dosed.  Typically one dose of that is good for a long while.  I am assuming you are giving small doses each time.

The itchy skin issue...SallyP when she was still here would always recommend the Aloe Juice (you can get it at Walmart in the Pharmacy area).  Now how much I don't know, nor do I know how often.  I never had to use it but she swore by it for sure.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2018, 12:54:25 PM »

Selenium gel/paste, loose minerals or powdered Selenium supplement lasts in the body 24 hours. The injection lasts 21 days.

Twice a year I use Replamin Plus as a boost- 5 cc for standard sized goats/2.5 cc for Nigerians or kids- a day for 5 days, then once twice a month. I boost them just before breeding and just before kidding. Some people give them a dose once a week. Mine do well with once every other week, some I don't have to give more than twice a year.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
MedsHomestead
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Posts: 123



« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2018, 02:43:17 PM »

Pat  - I am in Central PA 20 miles north of Harrisburg, PA - about 35 miles NorthWest of Hershey, PA. 

Birdie - thanks for the heads up - I gave her 3 small doses of Selenium  - I would dose, then not treat for 2 days - I did that 3 times.  I have been keeping up with the B-Complex, I dose 4 days withhold 4 days and so on - I give that to her orally and it is water soluble - so I feel better about that - she should pee out anything her body doesn't need.

She is responding thank goodness.  she seems itchy all the time - she has a few spots she has rubbed the hair off - but all in all I think she is coming back around.

Thanks to all for you advice!  Sometimes I over react when they get sick.
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imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2018, 05:30:38 AM »

Meds, I am the same way, I over react too.  We do that because we love and care for them so much.  I'd rather a person over react than to not react at all and not care if they live or die.  Kudo's to you for all you do for your goats.
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~ Birdie ~
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