HomeHelpLoginRegister

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
May 23, 2019, 10:28:04 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search

News
hihand Welcome!

Stats
1895 Posts in 97 Topics by 728 Members
Latest Member: staceyneil
+  Welcome to Goat Beat!
|-+  Goat Beat; The Heart of What Keeps us Going
| |-+  Pregnancy to weaning (Moderators: imalilbirdie, pearplum, nancy d, dragonlair, sweetgoats)
| | |-+  What are the Odds?
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Topic: What are the Odds?  (Read 116 times)
ND21st
Goataholic
***
Posts: 145


« on: May 03, 2019, 09:07:09 AM »

For the third year in a row I've gotten a 3:1 buck to doe kid ratio.  I've used 3 different sires with the same results.  I've read that breeding in different times of a cycle can affect gender, but anything else I can do to up the female chances?  Before this, I've always gotten at least an even ratio and even doe favored.  Very frustrating!
Logged
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1729


Missouri


« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2019, 01:08:06 PM »

Are the does closely related?  Are you using the same does for the last 3 years? 

I find that I always have a few more bucks than does each year, but it is only by a few.  Since does are easier to sell ( at least for me)  I feel your pain !
Logged
ND21st
Goataholic
***
Posts: 145


« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2019, 08:28:27 PM »

Most of the does I've used the past 3 years are in the 5 to 7 years old range, and previously they've delivered at least one doeling per litter.  Most are somewhat related, but all from different dads.  Yes, give me females!  I'm wondering if maybe the weather has some factor?
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19522


Texas


« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2019, 07:30:13 AM »

bloodlines, in my personal opinion have a great affect on Doe to Buck ratio's.  Look at the sire...was he a twin birthing? (we never used a buck that was a single kid)...in his twin birthing was his sibling a doe or buck?  Same with your Does...were they buck/doe or doe/doe?  I believe that to be the answer.  There are some bloodlines that are more prone to Buck or Doe birthing.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1729


Missouri


« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2019, 01:56:59 PM »

Way too complicated for me to keep track of Birdie!  By the time I got everything figured out breeding season would be over and no one would be bred  Roll Eyes  I am lucky I come about 50/50 every year.
Logged
ND21st
Goataholic
***
Posts: 145


« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2019, 08:25:55 PM »

I'd have to really search that out but you'd figure using a different sire each season would lessen the chances of that same odd result.  3 to 1 three years in a row is pretty startling.   
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 08:37:02 PM by ND21st » Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19522


Texas


« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2019, 06:50:59 AM »

It's really not too hard.  The buck you select you would know if he's a twin birthing, and if his other sibling was a buck or a doe.  Then go back to momma and see if she was a twin and if she was, was she a buck/doe twin or doe/doe twin.  That's the beginning of what we did on our farm.  We were fortunate enough to have been told this by the Show Me Boer Goat breeders in Neosho Missouri that we bought BoCephus from.  They do embro transfers.  No buck actually mounts their Does.  No FB Boer Doe carries a baby.  They are in it for the bloodlines and the best boers they can get.  Which it all stands to reason...even in humans...such as my ex husbands family...there hadn't been a girl born in the family for 21 yrs.  Until my ex's sister married and had a girl.  My ex's family line was 1 girl and 8 boys born.  My ex's sister married a man that he was the only boy born in over 25 yrs.  They had a girl their second child.  My family is predominantly boys...out of 13 kids my parents had, only 4 were girls.  I had a son. 

BoCephus (our Boer buck) was a buckling/buckling born twin.  He threw bucklings for the most part, except on the Doe whom I bred him to that was a doeling/doeling twin, and threw twin doelings on her first kidding and then I bred her to BoCephus, and she threw a buckling/doeling birth.  Roady (my Kiko buck) was a buckling/doeling twin when he was born.  He threw all buckling/doelings on 36 Does he was bred to.  Oberon (my other kiko buck) was a buckling/doeling twin at birth and he was put on my best Boer Does who were doeling/doeling twins, and they threw 75% doeling/doeling twin birthings.  That's how my herd was built up.  Then Tadpole (my genemaster buck)being from another Kiko buck named Brick, and a quint birthing of 3 boys and 2 girls, I put him on Oberons daughters and I again got 50/50 buckling/doeling ratios but that's also what I wanted since those babies were triple registered.  Those bucklings brought me a mint!!  And they were the only goats on my farm for sale...all doelings were retained.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
ND21st
Goataholic
***
Posts: 145


« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2019, 12:49:23 PM »

This is really interesting info and I thank you for taking the time to write it out.  I'm going to be much more aware of this from now on!
Logged
dragonlair
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 9624



« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2019, 08:27:28 PM »

The University of Maryland Small Ruminant program publishes stuff from Australia and New Zealand about sheep and goats. Research they did on sheep found that ewes fed grain shortly before (3 weeks maybe? I forgot the exact time) breeding tended to have more ewe lambs and those ewes strictly on roughage (grazing or hay) tended to have more ram lambs. The report showed all the stats/breeds and such. It was very interesting. Sooooooo......

I tried it this year. I added whole oats to their pelleted feed, cut out their alfalfa pellets and cut back a bit on their hay prior to breeding. I started them back on their alfalfa pellets and regular diet after I knew they had settled, 6 weeks after breeding I think it was.

I am currently overrun with doelings and only got a tiny handful of bucks.
Logged

DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19522


Texas


« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2019, 05:36:37 AM »

I don't know that, that research would have worked on my farm...all our livestock was fed grain twice a day.  Though the cows didn't get much grain at all...just enough to say they got some, and keep them coming up to the barn morning and night.  The horses only got a little grain as well.  Our farm had such lush green pastures, thick with Bermuda and Purple clover, the cows and horses didn't need much grain.  Goats, after they cleaned out the woods, as high as they could reach, it was basically grazing and we all know how they feel about grazing...so they got a little grain morning and night as well.  I've heard so many tales about putting apple cider vinegar in the water to change the x/y factors...now this research you share with the grain issue.  I truly do not think any food or additives is going to change the basic gene pool of any animal or human.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1729


Missouri


« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2019, 01:08:33 PM »


was basically grazing and we all know how they feel about grazing...


My goats graze just as well as they browse and once I let them out on the pasture they don't stop eating.  I guess no-one told them goats don't graze? Grin

I grain all year too.  Seems to work for me with pretty much a 50/50 split every year since I started doing this goat thing  Smiley
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.20 :: SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines
Amber design by Bloc | XHTML | CSS
candlewick