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Topic: 3 lame kids update 5-17  (Read 463 times)
Julie H
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Posts: 1795


Missouri


« on: April 29, 2019, 01:28:23 PM »

I now have 3 lame babies.  1 has had a round of antibiotics/ Banamine ( as per vet) and been to the vet and is still on 3 legs 2 weeks later.  He said she must have really twisted it ( back leg at the knee, hock??)

Other 2 are siblings!  I has been tippy toeing for a week.  No heat or swelling but he had penn and banamine.  The other -his sister- just came up that way on Sat eve.  She has had 1 round of Baytril/ Banamine and will get the other final tonight.  She is bearing a little weight on it now, but what gives??

The pen is cleaned every day and they go out to pasture either with the horses or in the pasture off their area.  I just wonder if they are just playing too hard?  

I've had the occasional limping kid, but 3?  I dipped all navels after birth and they are all doing great and growing well. 4-5 weeks old now nursing their mothers still ( of course!!)  Anything I should look for?
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 01:10:14 PM by Julie H » Logged
imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2019, 05:44:12 AM »

have you checked the bottoms of their hooves?  Do they have hoof rot?  If it's black and smelly, maybe a tad of whitish flaky stuff in there, that's hoof rot.  Wet conditions will cause that.  Koppertox is the treatment you need for that.  But first we have to get as much of the rot out as we can without bringing blood.

I'd have the vet xray the leg of the first baby.  If it's broken he/she will need that leg casted.  Sprains can be as bad as breaks.  Keeping them in and quiet in small areas is best with sprained or broken legs.  Watch for bone infections if it's indeed broken.

Dipping navels is the best way to prevent navel ill.  However, if it didn't seal quick enough or your iodine is old, then there are times that it just doesn't work.  Navel ill should have shown it's ugly face by now though at the age these kids are...but it's possible that they do have navel ill.  I wouldn't rule it out until the vet does. 

I'd keep those kids in a smaller enclosure...if possible with just their mothers.  Let them have time to heal up.  Try ( and that's really funny to say with babies who love to play) to keep them as quiet as possible.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1795


Missouri


« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2019, 01:25:39 PM »

No foot rot.  Hooves are sweet smelling(  Grin)  and normal color , no black or squishy stuff.  My goats absolutely hate wet conditions and I have a hard time getting them out to the pasture if there is mud on the ground or if it rained recently.  The outside of their pen drains well and no mud but it is wet at times with all the rain we have been having.

The vet went over the first baby really good and she did have some heat/ swelling in the joint it wasn't broken.  The heat and swelling are gone now and she will touch the tip of her toe down when walking so that is some improvement.

I will try to keep them as inactive as possible, which is easier said than done tongue
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dragonlair
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2019, 05:54:06 PM »

A selenium deficiency can cause lameness. How's the Se in your area?
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2019, 05:56:02 AM »

I agree Deb, selenium deficiency will cause this as well.  I know Missouri is Selenium Deficient.  In Julies area as well.  We were very selenium deficient in Mid Missouri as well.  Same with N.W. AR, they are low, just not as bad as Mid Missouri. 

When our horse colt had navel ill, his joints swelled, got hot, and when they put him on the antibiotics, and then drained his joints, the swelling and the heat went away...Now grant you, when he was brought to me with Navel Ill and I was told by the owner "You can have him if he lives."  (Oh how I hated that man!!!), I rushed him to the vet and they worked like crazy on that poor 4 day old baby half starved to death (even when I told his owner, the mare had no milk for the baby and gave him bottles and milk to raise the baby on, and the RAT BA*T@RD DIDN'T DO IT), and sick as could be, that there was only a 50% chance he would survive...told the Vet "it's 50% alive or 100% dead if we don't...just do it!" and Doc worked like crazy on him.  Some of you may remember "Handsome"....the little bay colored Quarter Horse baby. 

Navel Ill took his life 30 days after we started doctoring him for it.  However, goats do not react to navel ill the same as horses or cattle do.  Goats are easier to get over it than other animals.  I'd still watch those joints just in case.  Caught early will speed the healing time.  Which you have already done.

But I'm leaning now, more towards the selenium issue than the navel ill.

There's got to be a reason for this.  If it was just one baby, I wouldn't think too much...but 3 babies from 2 different moms...Now that concerns me, that we need to pin point this. 
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Posts: 1795


Missouri


« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2019, 12:36:49 PM »

A selenium deficiency can cause lameness. How's the Se in your area?

We can be low.  I gave everyone a dose of the vitamin E / selenium gel at birth, but will give it to them again and see if that makes a difference.

Birdie-- That is what I find odd that the 2 siblings would come up like that.  Their mother is eating good and carrying really good weight and the kids are big.  I have out minerals 24/7 and a protein mineral block(every so often) and I see the kids at both as well as the does.

Our hay is good, both hay fields and pasture heavily fertilized and I am feeding the exact same feed that I always have, except that I added flax into it.

Now to catch the 3-- even on 3 legs they give my daughter and I a real run around  Grin
« Last Edit: May 02, 2019, 12:43:47 PM by Julie H » Logged
imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19594


Texas


« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2019, 07:18:38 AM »

ahhhh….hmmmm….ok now I'm wondering...fresh green lush spring grasses, I'm wondering now, if they aren't foundered.  Hmmm.  Are they going out after the dew goes off, and with a full belly of hay before they head to the pastures?
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1795


Missouri


« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2019, 01:12:14 PM »

It isn't founder as I know in horses it makes them uncomfortable to walk. Feet are not hot .  These guys are 3 legged whirlwinds, who never stay still !
 
We got the 3 dosed with the selenium gel last night,  so we will see what happens in a day or 2.
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19594


Texas


« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2019, 07:30:57 AM »

If it's not an ailment, maybe it's a birth defect??  Huh?
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1795


Missouri


« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2019, 01:58:20 PM »

No because they were all fine since birth.  They look normal in every way.  I will get a good look at them tonight when they come in from grazing to see if they are walking any better!
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Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1795


Missouri


« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2019, 01:18:33 PM »

UPDATE--

Thought I would give a little update on my gimpy kids Smiley

They are all doing fine and walking again.

After the vet diagnosis and his suggested treatment ( which i did) on the little doe with a swollen joint on her back leg.  She had no improvement and after a couple of days the swelling was worse as well as the heat.  So I did 5 consecutive days of banamine along with 10 consecutive days of Penn ( both oral )  and she is walking now and there is no evidence of swelling or pain.  The leg and muscle is a little underdeveloped but I see a little improvement each day.  She has been off all medication for about 2 weeks now.

The twins bounced back after each getting 2 doses of banamine and 5 of penn. All given orally.  They had no heat or swelling that I could see but I wanted to get right at it if it was anything like the first doe. 
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imalilbirdie
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Posts: 19594


Texas


« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2019, 07:05:54 AM »

I'm really glad to hear that they are bouncing back from this.  But what was it that they had?  It's obvious that the Penn worked, so it had to be some kind of bacterial thing...while I am still leaning towards it being navel ill, if it had been that, it wouldn't go away that easy, but I do know that goats with navel ill respond way better to treatment than any other livestock animal will.  So I am totally perplexed as to what this could have been and without the vet pulling fluid from the joints, you may never know truly what it was/is. 

I know without you, they would have never healed.  You're a fantastic goat momma.  Good job.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1795


Missouri


« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2019, 11:17:41 AM »

Thanks. 

I am just so happy they responded to the treatment .  In all my years of goats I have never had to medicate a baby before and to have 3 in 1 year?  Kind of threw me for a loop!

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dragonlair
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Posts: 9672



« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2019, 06:32:35 PM »

Good job, glad they are all better!!!!!!
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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