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Topic: Pregnant Doe Underweight  (Read 146 times)
ND21st
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Posts: 171


« on: January 30, 2020, 09:06:39 AM »

I have an 8 yr old doe who is 3 months pregnant.  She has recent weight loss and this morning had trouble getting up when her penmates knocked her down when rushing for grain.  Prior to breeding she was fine and healthy with good color so I did not deworm.  But I have to suspect a wormload and asking if I should give her a dose of Ivermectin?  Her eye color is still good, she has a great appetite and moving around well.  I want to get her started on a wormer as I won't be getting fecal results for a while yet.
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19735


Texas


« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2020, 08:31:26 AM »

Well, in all honesty, your Doe has hit her life span expectancy.  8 years is the life span of a goat.  So things like this are going to happen to her as her muscles age and her bones become weaker, and being pregnant, she's zapped of all that was keeping her healthy and strong.  So here's what I'd do if she were mine.  I would do a fecal on her before dosing her with any thing.  She is after all pregnant and may not be passing on as much good nutrients to the kids as she did in her younger years and a wormer of any kind could seriously harm both her and the kids.  If she tests for worms then use the appropriate wormer to help her...otherwise I would get that girl on a probiotic and keep her on high calcium until the day she births.  Treat her with a lot of TLC.  She's going to need it to make it through this.  Keep us posted please.
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~ Birdie ~
ND21st
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Posts: 171


« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2020, 09:20:33 AM »

Thanks much.  I thought 10 to 12 years was closer to life expectancy?  Most of mine and other goater friend's have  lived at least that long.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2020, 09:24:07 AM by ND21st » Logged
Julie H
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Posts: 1944


Missouri


« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2020, 12:37:10 PM »

Birdie is right about the age .  My does routinely kid into their early teens, but what I have found in the older girls is they may suddenly lose weight quickly and it can happen very suddenly.  Once they can be knocked down by the others they are at risk for bullying and being run off of the food.  The herd mates seem to pick up on the weak very quickly and they can spiral own overnight.

In addition to what Pam suggested, I would separate her from the herd and maybe put her with a extremely docile/ young goat as a companion.  She is going to need to eat in peace , get the nutrients she needs with fear of the others.

I just lost a 10 year old doe this way.  I separated her as soon as I saw her being knocked down, and despite my best food and care she didn't respond and died when we had a real cold snap.

I hope you have better luck.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2020, 11:46:13 PM »

My does routinely live and kid well into their teens. I feed grain daily. In the winter I add whole oats and soaked beet pulp, then, as it gets closer to kidding, I add alfalfa pellets. For those that may be a bit on the thin side, I add rice bran to their feed, about an ounce a day. This adds calories without adding too much protein. BOSS would be another possibility for extra fat.

Depending on where you live, your fecal may not be accurate, as in colder, northern climates the female worms cease egg production in the winter months so the fecal will give you a false negative. Good color is good, it means the load of blood sucking worms is low (barberpole and liver flukes), but the condition sucking worm load may be high. Most worm meds are safe for pregnant does, Ivermectin and Safeguard are 2 of the safest ones. Valbazen is not, please don't use that or Prohibit, on your expectant mothers.

Any idea how here teeth are? Does she seem to chew her hay normally or does she keep a cud stuck in her cheek? One of my older does does that, her teeth are not as sharp as they used to be, so she can't chew as well as when she was younger. I have to push the stuck cud out from between her teeth and cheek. She gets extra beet pulp and rice bran to help keep her fiber intake around normal. I feed all my goats their grain separate from the others, and for the thin or older ones, I give them extra hay outside of their pen, so they have a bit of extra they don't have to fight over.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Julie H
Goat Genius
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Posts: 1944


Missouri


« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2020, 01:09:15 PM »

Cydectin is also safe for pregnant does and so far does not have the resistance issues that Safeguard does.
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imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2020, 07:27:16 AM »

Cydectin is the new all around wormer....Ivomec is an all around wormer as well.  Almost as safe as safeguard is.  Especially in pregnant and/or nursing Does.  Safe for babies at the age of 8 weeks.  Can't beat that.
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~ Birdie ~
ND21st
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Posts: 171


« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2020, 09:36:06 AM »

No teeth issues, once the food gets there no bullying.  I supplement her as well. She gets twice daily grain and BOSS, good hay.  Appreciate all the info. 
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