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Topic: Impressed..  (Read 161 times)
dragonlair
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« on: February 18, 2020, 09:28:19 AM »

Several years ago I decided I wanted to raise Mini Nubians and Mini Lamanchas. I contacted the woman I bought my Nigerian herd from many years ago (she has some of the best Nigerians on the east coast and more) and went to look at her boys for sale. I chose my Volt, he was already proven and I really liked the looks of him and his pedigree. Totally impressive.

So, after seeing what he sired from my standard girls, plus learning just how awesome he and his line were, I went looking for some does who were worthy of his breeding. The breeder I bought him from had retired and sold her herd, so I contacted his original breeder and arranged to purchase 2 of the next years doelings.

In the meantime, I had advertised several Nubian doe kids for sale. I got a reply from a girl down state who was starting up a goat dairy. She bought 2 doelings from me on time payments. Soon after that, she lost her job after paying off 1 of the kids. So, she asked if I wanted to trade for the last of the money. Ok, sure, since she had several extremely well bred Nigerians. So I chose a weanling blue eyed doeling, well bred, a mature, proven Moonspotted doe and we traded those 2 for my doeling.

About a week later, when that weanling girl started to cough followed by the mature doe, I find out that she has something going thru her herd. She asked for suggestions, I told her to call a goat vet. She did. She ended up losing 3/4 of her herd.

Come to find out, she had bought several "pretty" does from a dealer who got them from an auction. Those does nicely brought in 3 different types of pneumonia into her herd, one of which was zoonotic and almost impossible to cure. Her vet suggested culling her entire herd. She didn't and eventually sold all her remaining goats.

Anyway, I find out well into the disease that my 2 girls had Pneumonia they picked up from her herd before they left. Very contagious, airborne. Even though those 2 girls had been quarantined from my existing herd, it wasn't long before most were sick. I treated them all with the cocktail of antibiotics my vet recommended, but I lost one of my best does and several more had permanent lung damage.

Fast forward to this fall. One of the does who had been left with lung damage (who happened to be the most expensive, best bred, best breed type and dam of my best selling kids of both sexes) started with a hacking cough. We fought that all winter, several more, including the original Nigerian Buck, developed the cough.

I started the cocktail from the previous outbreak. It helped some but not enough. I tried everything I could find for that doe- garlic, cough syrup,  antibiotics, Elderberry syrup, I mean EVERYTHING I could find. She just went down hill until I lost her 2 weeks ago.

Two days after her death, I was reading about other herbs that help replace antibiotics. I found that Oregano was effecting against that really bad form of Pneumonia that had been introduced into my herd. So, I bought a huge container of Oregano and started giving it to all the goats who had even the slightest cough.

Within a week, just about every cough is gone. And the goats LOVE the taste of the Oregano! WOOHOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Smiley Smiley Smiley kiss kiss kiss

I got a still for Christmas so I can make my own essential oils. I also have a friend who has oregano growing wild on her property. I am going to get as many plants as I can from her and cover my front lawn with them, next to the Lemon Balm, and make my own Oregano EO and dry some, too, to add to their feed.  Smiley

So, if anyone has issues with sicknesses that they either don't want to use antibiotics for (like milkers or those going for meat) or have something that is not responding to antibiotics....give Oregano a try!
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
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Texas


« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2020, 06:49:12 AM »

bacteria and viruses have almost become immune to chemical medications.  Sad but oh so true.  Not that I truly believe in a total herbal cure for any thing, but I will say it can truly help.  I tried that once with our goats, and our outcome was not good, and I swore it off after that.  I do believe that using them to keep immune systems strong is great, but cure all's, I don't believe it in that any more. I'm happy this has helped your herd.  And I'm sorry for your loss.  I know the goats are lower down on your favorite animal category, so all this work must be troublesome to you.  Shame that had to happen to all that girls goats. 
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
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Posts: 1883


Missouri


« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2020, 01:17:26 PM »

Great news that it helped the rest of your goats.  I wish you found out sooner so you could have tried it on your doe.  I am sorry you lost her  Cry

I don't have much faith in traditional medicine because it is so hit and miss. I don't know if it is the vet's inability to diagnose correctly or just the drugs don't work.  If oregano worked for you that is a real benefit.  I hope it keeps working or you won't need it ever again , now that you bought a ton of it !!
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dragonlair
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Posts: 9757



« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2020, 03:14:06 PM »

I am putting it on the grain of the ones who were coughing, I plan on doing it for 2 weeks, just to make sure.

The FDA is actually supporting the use of Oregano oil in livestock feed in place of antibiotics. I think Perdue uses it? They call it something similar to oregano, forgot what it is. Some of the beef producers are using it also. Researchers found that one of the natural chemicals in oregano kills psuedomonas.

Birdie, I love my goats, I just love the dogs and horses a bit more. If I didn't love them so, I wouldn't have 30 of them. Yeah, I finally broke down and counted how many I had. I needed to so I could buy the right amount of hypodermic needles for their BO-SE shots.  Sigh. LOL  laugh
« Last Edit: February 20, 2020, 03:15:40 PM by dragonlair » Logged

DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Pat
Caprine Guru
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Posts: 402



« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2020, 07:54:03 PM »

Wow..while I'm not sure I trust herbalistic products entirely, I know I absolutely do NOT trust pharmaceuticals...only because they are essentially "dirty" in that they affect lots of other systems iin addition to the target.  Yes, I use them (on me and the critters), but I also know to watch out for "side effects" on  systems other than those affected by the disease.  I'll definitely give oregano a chance...as far as I can find out, it has no adverse sysetemic effects
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Posts: 19686


Texas


« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2020, 06:14:17 AM »

I think the colleges are supporting the Organic methods because that's what todays human population wants to hear.  I know so many organic certified farms that continue to use chemical medications and fertilizers on their crops.  Organic is just a name to charge more money for the product, sort of like the "Angus Beef" you see marked on a package of steaks, you can not tell if that meat is Angus or if it's Jersey once that animal is processed.  I had one Cattle rancher who is certified Holistic/Organic, tell me, "If a cow should need chemical medications, she will receive it, as it's cheaper to give a chemical medication than to loose a $2000.00 cow."  I believe there are ranchers out there that will cull the animal due to having a cold.  Now that's absurd.  I don't believe in a totally homeopathic regimen, but I do believe it's beneficial to animals for immune support, but not treatment if it becomes an issue within my herd.

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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 9757



« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2020, 12:24:48 AM »

Up here, to be certified organic, a farm has to be approved by the state organic farmers group. They are so freaken strict, and they do go to the farms, unannounced, and inspect. If they get caught with unapproved chemicals, they get booted and are unable to use the organic label.

I know a dealer who buys as many of the dairy cattle he can get from organic dairies. They can't use regular medications if they have medical issues, so the dealer buys them, treats them and resells them to regular dairy farmers for a pretty good profit.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19686


Texas


« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2020, 07:47:58 AM »

Same restrictions with the Organic farmers I know.  3 of those certified Organic farmers were here in GB.  All three said they still use fertilizers and chemical medications.  I would venture to guess that it depends on each state and the inspectors. 

To me, it's nonsense (just my personal opinion)...A farmer can't afford to loose it's crops to insects (certified or not), a rancher can't afford to loose several head of cattle to contagious illness's....I've been in those shoes, crop farming, and ranching, and there is no certificate that will tell me to let that animal die and then cull it or loose 3600 acres of crops to insects or diseases.  No wonder our farming communities are going under.  Government and ignorant people, has totally ruined the ranching/farming communities.
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~ Birdie ~
dragonlair
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 9757



« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2020, 03:31:55 AM »

Not sure what the federal guidelines are for organic farming, but I know Maines standards are strict. There are natural fertilizers and insecticides that are allowed for certified organic crops. They are not chemicals, they are all natural and according to those farmers I know who use them, they work very well, even better than the chemical ones they used to use. I've used some of them on my garden and they work great. However, they are more expensive than the chemicals.

Depending on the market, the farmers feel that the prices they get for their certified organic products outweighs their losses when they have to cull an animal because they couldn't cure it organically. I don't see how, but I don't know for sure. Up here, the market for organic products is enormous. There is a very strong organic community and organization Mainer Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association or something like that. They have helped write the standards for Maine organics, have a strong lobby and have a huge place where they have their Common Ground fair every fall. They do the certifications for organic in this state and are totally rabid when it comes to being completely chemical free. If you are caught using a chemical medication, fertilizer or pesticide you lose your organic certification.

I could make a killing selling certified organic goat milk, cheese and other milk products, kids and milking stock, manure for gardens, and buck kids for meat if I wanted to go that route. Organic feed costs are prohibitive. Between that, and the possibility of losing one of my animals to a disease that could be easily cured by antibiotics is more than I am willing to do. My animals are family, as well as productive livestock.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
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