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Topic: Goats enjoying the new pasture  (Read 494 times)
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1982


Missouri


« on: August 21, 2020, 12:22:28 PM »

It was a nightmare to fence.  Lots of corners and up and down terrain.  It took every inch of the 5 rolls of fencing we bought and much to my husbands disgust the last short section he had to splice all the left overs and we just had enough.

Goats are thrilled so I think it was worth all the pain.  I swear nothing goes easy for us anymore!!





My 2 youngest enjoying the abundance.  They are growing so fast !!

« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 01:03:05 PM by Julie H » Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19764


Texas


« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2020, 06:37:38 PM »

Omg...i truly needed to see this..i finally smiled for the first time in days.  Beautiful babies...and lush green grass.  They look so happy.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1982


Missouri


« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2020, 01:04:53 PM »

Pam I hope you guys can hang in there.   Soon you will be smiling again and all this nightmare will be a thing of the past.
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
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Posts: 19764


Texas


« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2020, 11:03:18 AM »

i keep coming into the forum and just glaring at your pictures and smiling and thinking how precious all your goats are.  The peaceful grazing and just being happy.  That relaxing feeling you get knowing they are healthy and full bellies, and the peace and quiet that surrounds that life...thats my saving grace right now. 

Thanks for sharing that.

I went out and played with my dogs, and that helped cheer me up.  Sammy cried again when we left and that breaks my heart in pieces.  I hate leaving them as bad as they hate me leaving.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1982


Missouri


« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2020, 11:59:49 AM »

I can't imagine not having my dogs and I imagine it is making it that much harder for you. 
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dragonlair
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
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Posts: 9831



« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2020, 06:00:28 PM »

Nice fencing job! Those rolls can certainly be a horror show to handle. You guys did a great job putting it up! Your goaties look so happy! Splicing? Yeah, those rolls are never perfectly enough and you always need "just a little bit more". Not enough to buy a full new roll, but more than you have in the rolls. I think farmers are some of the most creative people in the world. His your hubby a tad OCD? Splicing like that would drive my OCD brother, sons and late Dad crazy. Fortunately, it totally skipped me.

Up here in New England, driving fence posts can be a challenge due to the damage caused by the Glaciers many years ago, and, in my case where I live on top of a hill that is the edge of a river basin, soil run off, it's all ledge! Ledge and Kennebec River bed clay.  You have to reposition the post several times just to find a place with enough dirt to hold it before you hit ledge. A lot of people take 5 gallon buckets, fill with cement and put the fence post in the middle. That works well for electric fencing, but not for the actual rolled wire or cattle panel fencing. I use trees a lot, baling twine the fence to the tree so I don't cause any damage to the tree.

My next goat is to buy a pallet of cattle panels and start fencing in my entire property. That way I can let the horses have full roam over the 1 acre for a day once a week to eat the grass. Then, let the goats loose to eat the weeds and saplings. It's not a lot, but every little bit helps with the food bill and the animals state of mind. Now that it has cooled down, I can go around and "harvest" all the burdock and drag it over to the various goat pen areas to feed to them. They LOVE it. It's so bitter, but they chow it down like it was candy. I love listening to them chew it, it's like listening to someone chew celery. lol

Pam, any more possibilities on a house? I can't imagine the stress you are Shane are going through right now.  Please, take care of yourselves!  Deep breathing for a few minutes every couple of hours and 5 minutes of meditation help a lot.  Hang in there, sending out prayers for you.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1982


Missouri


« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2020, 12:12:09 PM »

Dragon,  It is so nice to have it done.  We still need to string 2 strands of barb wire at the top, but since it isn't required to keep the goats in it is no hurry.  My husband and son did a beautiful job on the fencing.  Everything straight and strong.  I have no idea what it might look like if I did anything more than put the clips on !!

On our MN property my animals didn't have much grass.  The horses had just enough in their fenced area to look for something and the goats and cow pasture had just enough to have several hours grazing during the growing season but they were happy. I actually liked it better because no weight issues with my horse and I had basically no worm issues.  It was just soooo cold !!!
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19764


Texas


« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2020, 10:50:28 AM »

MN has a shorter growth time span right?  My daddy always told me to never overstock my pastures...and then when I married my first husband, of course we had more than enough land for all our livestock.  Shane and I practiced that same management on our farms.

I like building fence.  I taught Shane how to build fence.  I built 3 fenced pastures one was 8 acres, and 2 were 5 acres, while Shane was at work for 3 weeks.  The only thing I needed help with was hanging the 16 foot gates.  So basically they were done by the time he came home.  Thanks be to God for tractors! Haha.

Your place is beautiful Julie.  You have to be proud as punch of it.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1982


Missouri


« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2020, 12:31:31 PM »

It varies in MN , but the norm is mid-May- Sept ( and that is generous) when you have grass.  It takes that long for all the snow to melt  Grin

It is my in-laws farm Pam.  We have done a lot to it ( fencing, buildings, lean-to etc..)  since we came back 6 years ago and my husband and 2 boys work hard to keep everything up, maintained, cut and running.  One day it will indeed be ours but we do have a sense of pride since we do everything now.  His dad can't do much at all now, maybe an hour on the tractor to brush hog now and then but that is about it.  Sight and balance issues .  We do all we can to keep the place nice for them.

You can put your fencing skills to work on your new home Pam.  With 14 acres you must have animals!!
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19764


Texas


« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2020, 06:45:18 PM »

well Julie.  You all have done a gorgeous job with the place.  And to dedicate to your in laws that way, that says some thing pretty special about you.

No animals for us for awhile.  Will have to save money before we can fence it all off, but one day we will.
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~ Birdie ~
Julie H
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1982


Missouri


« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2020, 01:20:47 PM »

Time goes by so fast you will be loving on goats before you know it!!

My FIL was a builder so he always took care of the places they lived and my husband and his brothers grew up with that example.  If it breaks you fix it.  It would have been awful to have the place fall down around them when he spent the last 20+ years keeping it nice.  I hope most kids would do that for their parents ( if they could of course).

It was in deplorable condition when they bought it 27 years ago Wink
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19764


Texas


« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2020, 08:31:24 AM »

We can only pray that our children remember their roots and how they were raised and come back to them often.  Todays world is toying with their minds, and many do not see things the way we do.  When my Son was recently challenged  he did come back to his roots and his upbringing.   He now grows his own garden, he is supplying food off this own back yard.  He sees what this world is doing.  I praise God for that.
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~ Birdie ~
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