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Topic: Tips on showing.  (Read 16619 times)
Crissa
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Love me, love my Nubians. (non-negotiable)


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« on: January 31, 2008, 09:46:52 AM »

Thought I'd make a thread where we can talk about showing tips. Including what clippers to use, how to clip, how to train a goat to stay set up, etc.  Wink

First question how exactly do you clip a goat? I've sheared sheep but I know it's not the same. Are there places where you leave some fur?
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TwiliteMeadows
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Texas


« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2008, 11:02:46 AM »

Good Idea Crissa..excellent thread and I will make it a sticky for you.  Smiley  There are lots of show people in here and all willing to share their knowledge and know how with you and others like you.  thanks for the idea and the thread. Smiley
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~ Birdie ~
PeaceGoats
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2008, 12:43:15 PM »

I'm wanting to know about clipping too. Not for showing, but for Shanti this spring- he has such a hard time shedding (he has so much winter hair!) it takes a long time and he's all itchy. Good idea for a thread. Can you use dog clippers? I have some for Ruby, forget what brand. They have various plastic "guards" you can put on the end that keeps the hair longer... can I take those off and just have the metal clipper part, or would that burn him or cut him?
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Emily (the person) Pace, Shanti, and Melino (the goats)
Sally P
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New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2008, 02:30:57 PM »

Yes Emily--you can use the guards if you want to.  When we show clip we don't use guards but we want their hair down close.  You start at the tail area and head for the neck.  If you don't want to clip as closely, you can go in the direction the hair grows---neck to tail.  Do the body, then the legs and then the neck and head.  Inside the ears (if you are show clipping).  Some people do the face and just cut right off those lovely long lashes---we don't.  You want to clip up around the hooves so that the top of the hoof meets the hair on the leg.  (Does that make sense). 
The biggest thing to know is---put them on a milk stand.  And give them a dish of grain.  That will keep them occupied while you are clipping.
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ockeracres
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2008, 02:47:50 PM »

I'd like to know how you get the girls (and boys) to stand still and leave their legs where you put them.  My girls hate having their legs touched, and as soon as I put one where I want it, they put it back where they want it.  I have a really great buck I want to show, but if I can't even get the girls to cooperate, how will I ever get him to?
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Sally P
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New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2008, 06:17:41 PM »

Been there many a time.  I've even had does prance on their hind legs in the show ring.  In fact that happened to me at Nationals--my yearling went right up on her hind legs and walked around the ring that way!!  It was just lovely.
After a while they get used to it.  When we are showing our bucks, I don't have a prayer of getting those legs set exactly right cause I can't reach over their back to set them.  And besides--who can pick up all that weight.  If they get really antsy---just walk them out of line (if you are standing still that is) and take a few steps with them (away from the judge) then turn and go back to the line.  Sometimes that helps settle them down.  Also a good trick with goats showing for the first time or two---don't be first in line.  Get in the middle of the lineup where you goat can see what's going on in front of him/her.  They learn a lot by just watching.
A lot of times when a goat moves it's foot in the ring it is because it has been placed in an uncomfortable spot.  A lot of people make the mistake of placing the hind feet to far out.  If it is a doe and she has an udder--you don't want any "air" showing between the leg and the udder.  Try to imagine with dry animals where the udder would be and place the legs according to that.  The front legs should be directly under the animal an not spread apart.
A trick to helping the foot and leg look much straighter:  when you reach down and grab the hind leg--just before you place it on the ground, turn it a little to the inside.  When the foot goes down, it will be perfectly straight and facing forward not outward.
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goatgirl15
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008, 09:36:03 PM »

i am having problems with some of my goats that don't like to lead the arch their necks and drag their feet. any suggestions?
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Sally P
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New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2008, 08:23:00 AM »

Make sure you have the collar way up by the ears.  If you let the collar slip lower, it begins to choke them, and they won't move.  Positioning the collar up where it belongs not only helps them walk forward, but also keeps their head up.  That collar should be up so that your hand is almost between the ears.
Also make sure that you are leading/walking by the shoulder of the goat=--not out in front of the goat.
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goat fever
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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2008, 09:30:16 PM »

My son's doe Rose only walks when she wants too.  She is a real joy for him to show.  Not really , but he loves her and does the best he can with her.  Now at home if she thinks she is going to get more feed, she will walk like a princess.  But for the most part is a horrible walker.  She will even lay down to avoid walking if she has too.  Sounds swett doesn't she Grin
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Proudly owned by herd of little angels.  I raise fainting goats and mini silky fainting goats.
debpnigerians
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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2008, 11:59:19 PM »

The best tip I can give you is RELAX....your goat IS going to make a fool out of you, so just relax and accept it.....one of the first shows I went to as a spectator when I first got into goats was the Ft. Worth Stock Show. I was VERY intimidated and impressed by all the big-name breeders who were there.....omigosh, it's KELLYE BUSSEY herself, of Twin Creeks!!!!!!   Wow - I felt like I was in the presence of royalty.....and was absolutley flabbergasted when her gorgous little doe took one look at the shavings in the ring and said "Oh,NO NO NO I don't THINK so!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!" and folded her dainty little legs up and laid down. Everyone was laughing, and it only took a minute to realize they were laughing because they'd been on the recieving end of goat behavior themselves. I haven't been intimidated since.....the only thing goats love more than food is pullong a fast one on their human, and there's o better time to do it than at a show! ROLF
« Last Edit: February 08, 2008, 11:41:41 PM by debpnigerians » Logged
ockeracres
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« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2008, 12:58:44 PM »

Oh thank goodness.  I am really  hoping the judge looks at my goats and not how I do showing them.  I guess that is usually the case, unless it is showmanship.  I've had goats for 4 yrs now and haven't gotten to show yet, this will be my first year.  I can't wait, I really want to see if the does I bred or bought, have what it takes.

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Sally P
Goat Genius
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Posts: 8923


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2008, 01:05:22 PM »

The biggest part of showing on the person's part is learning the sneaky little ways to make your goat look really good.  Another biggie--always keep the goat between you and the judge and NEVER walk around the back of the goat.  To change sides--gracefully walk around the goat's head.
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debpnigerians
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« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2008, 11:57:17 PM »

Oh boy - am I ever glad I checked this thread again....I discovered that if you go to the smilies [more] section and click on the little smilie on his knees bowing down as if before royalty what comes up is a smilie sticking his tongue out!!!!!  :AH Most certainly NOT the image I had in mind.....my apologies, y'all, but it wasn't my fault this time.
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Crissa
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Love me, love my Nubians. (non-negotiable)


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« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2008, 08:57:02 PM »

Okay here's another question from me, can you use dog choke collars for showing? Since they're less expensive and a little easier for me to get.  Wink
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TwiliteMeadows
Registered and Grade Nubians
ockeracres
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« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2008, 10:42:17 AM »

That is what I use.  Just don't hold it like a choke collar, you don't want to choke your girls.  Do you know what I mean?  Hold it at the rings, so it doesn't tighten. 
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