HomeHelpLoginRegister

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 24, 2014, 03:27:53 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search

News
Infrastructure change is complete!
Thank you for your cooperation.

Stats
22760 Posts in 1668 Topics by 836 Members
Latest Member: Grammykkh
+  Welcome to Goat Beat!
|-+  Goat Cafe; Just the Facts
| |-+  Meat Goats (Moderators: imalilbirdie, Candace, pearplum, nancy d, sweetgoats, Ace)
| | |-+  Anyone raise Texmaster Goats???
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 Print
Topic: Anyone raise Texmaster Goats???  (Read 8518 times)
GotmygoatMTJ
Guest
« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2009, 08:34:37 PM »

Its kinda wierd how we all want to breed disease free goats, yet, mytonics. lol
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17594


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #31 on: June 05, 2009, 08:58:41 PM »

Oh my..GMG..you know you're right..and I didn't view it like that either.  Roll Eyes Wink Grin  Oh man..heehee..kinda funny if you think about it.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
GotmygoatMTJ
Guest
« Reply #32 on: June 05, 2009, 09:38:36 PM »

Very funny actually.  Heres a slogan!

Come buy my goats!  They are full of disease that has been bred into them! 

People wouldn't buy them unless they had a catchy name, like Fainting Goat.   Angry
Logged
Ashlee H
Guest
« Reply #33 on: June 05, 2009, 10:07:56 PM »

Birdie - Yes, I would much rather buy a goat from GB members - do you know if any body has someting that might fit what I am looking for? Hum, maybe I should make a thread or something in the classifieds section. Maybe something like - Looking for good, hardy meat goat buck to improve the hardiness in my herd. Hum, I don't know - got any suggestions?

But, I have never really thought of the Mytonia condition as a disease though - I guess it could be considered that though.  ??? Hum, I just picture a disease as someting sickly, or weak - I don't see that in these goats - I see lots of muscle, and very hardy goats!!! A verry good friend of mine raises them (along with Boers, Sables, Alpines, and Nubians) and they say they are never sick and require the least amount of attention of any of there goats!!!

Goats arn't the only species that have Mytonia! I have heard that horses, and dogs, and even people can have that. And, several of my goat books I have, refer Myotonics as meat goats, adn I have several that are about meat goats only, including a huge one from Langstone University in Oklahoma's meat goat opperation (found out about the book from my 4-H agent!) and they all say thay myotonics are meat goats, and they actually have 10% more meat than other meat goat breeds.

But, any how, the Texmasters arn't suppose to have the Mytonia condition, and they
arn't fainting goats!!!
Logged
GotmygoatMTJ
Guest
« Reply #34 on: June 05, 2009, 10:46:31 PM »

Well what I was saying was that people wouldnt buy the fainting goat if it said Disease Ridden Goat.  Someone had to put catchy titles on them: Wooden Leg.  Tennessee Stiff Leg, Tennessee Fainting Goat.  There is also the title Mytonic goat but I hardly ever see people say that anymore.

Its not that these goats are actually sickly and going to die, but its the disease they have that makes people want them, but they wouldn't want them if they had a name that sounded unpleasing.
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17594


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #35 on: June 06, 2009, 06:35:30 AM »

Ashlee, does your good friend have any you could purchase from them?  Something that would please you?  I'm not saying that the goats they have aren't worth the money, I'm just saying I'll lay odds we can find them cheaper elsewhere.  Of course with every farm, you need to be aware of health issues and really measure the goat up.  Even big breeders have health issues, the same as the small breeder has.  So, yes, of course if you find one that has a price tag that's a little higher but it's the goat you want, then by all means you should go after it.

I'm not sure if Ace has the Texmaster or not.  You would have to ask her.  I know she has the goats for the breeding of it, but if she breeds it or not, I don't know.

If this "texmaster" has myotonic in it, then it carries the mytonia disease.  There's not getting out of that.  Any cross breed with Myotonic from my research says it will not faint.  Even if it's half myotonic half boer.  I do believe this is why the myotonic registration allows registering of a myotonic using pictures of goats in a stiffened position.  So, yes, I do believe them when they say "they do not faint."

Logged

~ Birdie ~
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8946


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #36 on: June 06, 2009, 08:48:43 AM »

The myotonics do not faint.  That is a misnomer.  What they actually do is stiffen all the muscle structure and some may topple over and others may just go stiff.  It doesn't last long. They do not faint dead away, but are awake and alert---just stiff.   I guess technically we shouldn't call it a "disease" but rather a genetic disorder!! Roll Eyes
Logged
GotmygoatMTJ
Guest
« Reply #37 on: June 06, 2009, 09:23:47 AM »

Haha.

So a goat that is only half mytonic can not "Faint". Or topple over because its muscles contract?  We use to have a little pygmy doeling that we thought was half mytonic because when she got scared her back legs went stiff. LOL
Logged
GotmygoatMTJ
Guest
« Reply #38 on: June 06, 2009, 12:19:40 PM »

Research shows that yes, a goat can not out run a predator.

Fainting goats WERE used to save the rest of the herd because they would "faint" and the predator would get them, not the sheep/cows. Whatever.

I would like to know what experts you have talked to and send them my way. I may not breed these animals but I know heck of a lot about all animals!
Logged
GotmygoatMTJ
Guest
« Reply #39 on: June 06, 2009, 01:02:25 PM »

You didn't answer my question, with all due respect.

You say that it was confirmed by you and MANY GOAT EXPERTS about the history of the mytonics.

I would like to know which ones they are and for you to send them my way.
Logged
Ashlee H
Guest
« Reply #40 on: June 06, 2009, 03:24:33 PM »

Ashlee, does your good friend have any you could purchase from them?  Something that would please you?   I'm not saying that the goats they have aren't worth the money, I'm just saying I'll lay odds we can find them cheaper elsewhere.  Of course with every farm, you need to be aware of health issues and really measure the goat up.  Even big breeders have health issues, the same as the small breeder has.  So, yes, of course if you find one that has a price tag that's a little higher but it's the goat you want, then by all means you should go after it.

Hum, I not for sure, but I can ask her! She only has a hand full of Myotonics (maybe 5 or 6 total), and a few each of the other breeds (they have mainly dairy breeds - Sable, Alpine, and Nubian, and a couple of Boers and their daughter shows them), so, not sure if she has any bucklings for sale, but I could ask, or maybe she may know of someone who does, hopefully closer than way out there in Texas!!! Really, I don't think my parents want to make that long of a trip just to get a goat (Mrs. Suzzane lives over 8hrs away!!!)

I compleatly understand that you are just trying ot help me, and I really appreciate it!!! Your right, i might just find the perfect goat I am looking for for a more reasonable price, and it just might be closer as well!

Thanks for all your help Birdie!!! I really appreciate it so much!!!

The myotonics do not faint.  That is a misnomer.  What they actually do is stiffen all the muscle structure and some may topple over and others may just go stiff.  It doesn't last long. They do not faint dead away, but are awake and alert---just stiff.  I guess technically we shouldn't call it a "disease" but rather a genetic disorder!! Roll Eyes


There, I like that allot better!!! I don't think of Mytonia as a disease, but a disorder sounds better!!!  Wink Yes, I know they don't actually faint, they just stiffen up when startled!!! That's why I think it is better to call them Myotonic goats instead of "fainting" goats!

Well, one of my commercial does, Lilly has some Myotonic in her! Not sure how much,she has in her, but I can see it in her build (- short stocky build, big horns, little ears, ect.) She actually has "fainted" a few times before. Once was when we gave her a shot, and well, I would say she sure wasn't expecting that and was sure surprised with the "big sting" of it (I think that was the 1st shot we had ever given her!) and she did just fall over. I was scared to death, and thought it was because she had a reaction that quickly from the shot, but she got back up and was just fine and walked away, like nothing ever happened!!!
Another time was when she was playing around in the kids "play yard" with some of the other young does, and Butter Cup, (another young doe I had at the time), jumped up on her, and tried breeding her - from the front end!!! (Opps, wrong end ther crazy goat!!! Haha!!! That was Butter Cup's 1st time in heat, and well, she was a little confused I guess  Grin !!!) But, I guess that startled Lilly (who hadn't been in heat yet, and didn't understand what was going on here with her crazy friend!) and she fell over again!!! But, Lilly is now going on 3 years old, and hasn't ever "fainted" since then!!! But, also, not much startles her anymore, as she is one of the bigger top goats in the herd!!!

So, I do think and have heard before that % Myotonic goats can faint, they just are more likely to grow out of it, or not exhibit it as much as full Myotonics!
« Last Edit: June 06, 2009, 03:26:51 PM by Ashlee H » Logged
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8946


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #41 on: June 06, 2009, 03:39:01 PM »

I don't want an argument to start on here over what a myotonic goat is or isn't.  But---do not believe all you read, or all that newer breeders tell you.  The reasearch being talked about has only been around for a short while---the other tales of the myotonic (including the origin in Nova Scotia) have been around for a very long time and most probably were stated by some of those who had the original breedings from those three original goats. 
Don't believe all that someone tells you about a breed.  They want to sell their goats and get them popular so that there will be a demand for them.  Well that's fine---however---I'm certainly not going to populate the goat world with an animal that is genetically defective--and that is what the myotonics are. 
Just watch sometime and see how many people make fun of those goats---making them "faint" just for the sheer pleasure of making it happen.  Nope---that's not responsible animal breeding or handling to me.  And if you think it is so "normal" for a goat to stiffen up out of fear and possibly fall over---you haven't been in the show ring with one and had it go flat right in front of the judge.  Try explaining that to JQ Public!!
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17594


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2009, 04:36:36 PM »

I agree Sally, we don't want to turn this innocent thread into an all out arguement so if we can keep our responses constructive to Ashlee's needs it will help her decide the best route to go.  I'm no angel in this thread by no means, as I am strongly against this over charging for goats..I don't care how much experience or non experience a goat herder has, they do NOT have $600 in a goat..no way can they have that much wrapped up in raising a goat. 

Ashlee what's your market calling for?  If you can't meet your market with your goat breeds then it does you no good to even attempt to try to go texmaster.  Those big breeders might sell one to you for $600 but are YOU going to get $600 out of a goat.  I'll lay odds you don't.  You see those big breeders have to have $600 out of their goats because of all the advertising and the scientific ends of what they do.  They have to pay for their high priced overhead and who does that for them?  Their customers do, and we didn't ask them to do that, we didn't ask them to spend outrageous amounts of money to be able to claim what they claim about their goats.  The goat itself did not cost them $600 to raise, if it did they would be bankrupt by now.  I'm sorry but that's how I feel about.

John you say you find the "dairy" influence of a goat not so desirable..may I ask why do you own Kiko then?  They derive from the Saanen.  That's a dairy goat.  "Every other so-called meat goat breed has significant DAIRY influence.  I personally consider that to be a big negative."
When you say true meat goats do not have big udders, Son..I have to totally disagree with you there.  My Reg SA Boers have large udders for their breed, and they do produce a lot of milk (aided with fastrack of course).  However, they are truly MEAT GOATS. 

Factual or not John, the "myth" according to you..that Myotonics were not used to be the kill for the sheep/cattle in case of preditor attack, I have to say I doubt this greatly, otherwise why would they have ended up in this country and so many of the "olden days" farmers telling that's exactly what they did with them.  It might be "myth" in your books, but in real life it's not a "myth".
Logged

~ Birdie ~
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17594


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2009, 06:19:13 PM »

John, I beg your pardon..I did not insult the breed and don't you dare say I did.  I joked about the breed like many people all over the world do.  I did say that I thought Pat and Suzanne's prices are too high and I stated what they do to bring that price up on their goats.  And they do and you can't deny that. 

I will say it again, I think the smaller farmer (breeder of texmaster) will indeed have just as good of a texmaster as Suzanne or Pat have.  They sell by their name.  Simple as that.

If you felt insulted I'm sorry about that..but you stated it, I didn't..you said you weren't partical to Dairy breeds yet you own (owned) Kiko.  That's double talking, double standards..you bashed your own breed.  You insulted yourself. 

As far as it costing $600 to raise a goat to adult age..PLEASE FEEL FREE TO PROVE THAT TO ME..I've raised hundreds of goats from infants to adults and still have them on this farm and NO WAY did they or have they costed me $600 to raise NOT EVEN 450.00 TO RAISE.  So please prove it to me if you raised a goat to adult age and it cost you $450 or even $600 to raise. 
If it costed me that much to raise an infant baby up to adult age, I'd be FLAT BROKE!!  I don't believe that for one little second.

John, if I chose to inform Ashlee or any other member on this forum that they can find goats cheaper priced and just as good elsewhere then that's helping Ashlee or anyone else.  It's not slaundering the breed telling her to look elsewhere for one that's cheaper.  I'll lay odds you do that every day, in the grocery store, the gas stations, the clothing stores and so forth.  Shop around, you may save some money..that's not bad advise John.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8946


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2009, 07:50:51 PM »

Whoa folks!!  I will go along with $600.00 for a goat.  I would have no problem putting that price (or even higher) on our permanent champion Togg buck.  I also know of Boer goats around that have gone for $1,000.00 and above.  It's not only what you have into the goat---it's the goat's lineage and potential that brings the price up.  Geezzz---if people can pay $5,000.00 for a dog or a cat---pray tell why isn't a goat worth the same top dollars?  Too many people sell their goats for low prices. 
I'm not saying it costs $600.00 to raise a goat---altho if the price of grain and hay keeps going up---then that may just prove to be a fact.  Don't forget--you have to add in all the meds, the food, your time (and that can be a biggie---you're time is worth a minimum of $10.00 per hour), housing, electricity in the barns, water,etc.  Add that all up and you might be surprised how much it costs to raise a goat.  It might even scare you.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.20 :: SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines
Amber design by Bloc | XHTML | CSS
candlewick