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Topic: Maiden milker  (Read 1854 times)
SweetBJ
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Posts: 125


« on: June 07, 2009, 01:15:11 PM »

One of my second year girls has developed her udders and looks ready to milk. Her dam was also a maiden milker, so not a huge surprise.

I'm just curious though: is there any reason not to take her milk? Her dam is the one who died this spring, and since I had nobody else bred, it would be very nice to have the milk!
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Pam B
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Posts: 1624


South Central Michigan


« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2009, 01:51:23 PM »

I would milk her, just as long as you know for absolutely sure she isn't preggers.  May as well take advantage of it if it's there.  But, if there is any off chance that she really is pregnant you shouldn't milk her until she kids or she could abort the babies.
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Willow Fen Farm
Nubian Goats
SweetBJ
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Posts: 125


« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2009, 05:36:52 PM »

Thanks, Pam.

She's never been in the presence of a male until the last couple weeks (buck is with the does during the "off season").

I'm seriously interested in breeding for this trait!
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Sally P
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Posts: 8938


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2009, 05:45:28 PM »

Precocious milkers (maiden milkers) are seldom really good milkers.  They usually produce an udder as a yearling only because their hormones are raging.  Many times it is just one side of the udder that produces "milk".  Usually the milk is a watery substance and the udder--fi left alone and not touched---will soon dry up.
I have never heard of any one wanting to breed for this "trait".  As far as I know, there is nothing saying that any offspring would produce the same condition.  It seems to be something that is only characteristic to that particular doe.
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dragonlair
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Posts: 8154



« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2009, 06:00:11 PM »

My very first Alpine buck had several daughters who had precocious udders. They all ended up being huge production does when they were finally old enough to breed. This buck was from a long line of * milkers with really high production. In fact this buck grew an udder and there was milk in it. Talk about a shock to a first time buck owner!
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Sally P
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Posts: 8938


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2009, 06:37:44 PM »

Bucks producing milk can happen---however--it's really rare.
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dragonlair
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Posts: 8154



« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2009, 06:49:38 PM »

He did, had quite the udder and had a hard time "drying" him off. I called the breeder in  a panic. She said that his sire had the same thing and his twin sister had a precocious udder, as did his mother when she was a kid. Not sure if its a genetic thing or just a lot of heavy breeding for high milk production that caused it.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
SweetBJ
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Posts: 125


« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2009, 04:45:52 AM »

Got her on the stand, but then started to wonder if she might have a bun in the oven after all, since she (Lily) is distinctly wider in the ribs than her litter-mate (Julie-Andrews). They've always had a difference in build though.

Only thing I can think of is that the buck might have somehow got to her when walking back from the pastures in late winter (they're in different pastures, but I walked them all back together sometimes if it was getting late or starting to rain).

I guess I get milk either way (and maybe a bonus goat!), just a question of when Roll Eyes. Aside from the big ribs, is there something else I should check to confirm what's going on?

Oh, and a big "ew!" to the udders on bucks.  Grin
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Pam B
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Posts: 1624


South Central Michigan


« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2009, 09:03:25 AM »

Count up five months from the late winter to get a general idea of when she might be due if she is preggers.  Signs of pregnancy aside from a larger, wider belly include a soft, puffy backside, softening of tail ligaments, development of the udder (which can start two months before kidding).  Eventually, if there are kids in there, you might be able to feel and see movement along the sides of her belly.

Somebody else tell what I am missing here.
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Willow Fen Farm
Nubian Goats
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