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Topic: very interesting, Lavender essential oil and vitamin c  (Read 10452 times)
hannebanane
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« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2009, 11:58:00 PM »

It's great to see that so many people are interested in natural remedies! I have used lavender, as well as Bach's Flower Essences (the Rescue Remedy is one of my favorites) and homeopathy (e.g. Traumeel (contains arnica) for muscoloskelletal injuries and Nux Vomica for intestinal problems) for years, possibly even decades, for all my animals (and some people) and mostly very successfully. Also, peppermint, chamomile and fennel to assist digestion. They are great for colicky babies (just an aside).
The (my) verdict is still out on garlic. I have given it for years to my horses and dogs, but although I know that it is used widely as insect deterrent/repellent and to assist the immune system, I am not sure that it really works. Same goes for glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM. But, of course, I don't know how bad the bugs and arthritis would be without giving/taking the stuff... I'll add lavender essential oil to the regimen come spring.
I don't raise animals for a living, but I would think that whether they are pets or livestock, we all want them to be as healthy as they can be while they are alive.
Would oral vit C work for snakebites as well in a pinch? Around here we are mostly concerned about rattle snakes, which are getting more plentiful and aggressive every year; and I'd love to have something on hand I could give before the vet can come. Is injectable Vit C readily available? I suppose, after the holidays, I will check into that as well as aromatherapy, which apart from using lavender consistently, I know nothing about. Your posts have been a timely reminder to get my natural remedies books out again and study up on some of it once more.
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Sunshine
Guest
« Reply #16 on: December 25, 2009, 01:20:29 AM »

Lavender is a healing herb. We keep it in the kitchen for burns it takes the pain away almost immediately. You can use it on scrapes and scratches too. It cleans too.
 I dont know about Vit C for snake bites. It wouldnt hurt thats for sure. I havent ever seen Injectible Vit C like some of the other Vitamins.
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Galavanting Goats
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« Reply #17 on: December 25, 2009, 04:18:48 AM »

We have Injectible vit c here from our produce suppliers. According to Pat coleby (Australian goat breeder) vit c intraveniously is the best way to go for utmost emergencies but then next in line is the injectible vit c, the oral is much slower acting however she highly recommend oral vitamin c for over all well being, she has done much study on it and used it for many things swearing by its helpful qualities.
 When we first started the goat rescue a few ears back, we used it on a daily basis, the only sick goats we ever had in our care were the rescues until we pulled them through their heath problems, once they were on their hooves they never got sick again whilst in our care (some up to 1-2years).

This time round after having a rest from the goat scene we returned back with less intensity no longer using vit c, sulpher, garlic etc in the foods and we had nothing but trouble with their health, once back into the routine we had some very healthy boys and girls, at the moment we are waiting on our powdered vitamin c but they seem to be doing fine on what they're recieving until it is available.

I encourage anyone to grab Pat Colebys' book called Natural Goat Care" she is so full of helpful information.
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hannebanane
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« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2010, 10:52:41 PM »

Did I ever get 'hooked' on Pat Coleby!!! I got her books Natural Goat Care (although I presently only have one goat left) and Natural Horse Care (currently more relevant since I have a severely laminitic horse and her information makes a lot of sense). While checking into seaweed meal, dolomite, magnesium (not available as magnesium 'orotate' in the States), I also found sodium ascorbate powder (Vit C) in the health food store and am confused as to its IV use (for emergencies). Technically, it is meant for oral use only, and that's how I have been using it for the past 2-3 days and will continue using it. Have any of you ever mixed it in sterile water or saline for injection and then given it IV or intramuscularly, or is there sodium ascorbate powder specifically for injection? I suppose in an emergency you do what you have to do to save your animal, but I want to be sure that I don't do more harm than good just because I misunderstand her advice. Snakes won't be out for another 3 months; by then I should have this figured out. It will also give me time to really read her books and not just skip around and read bits and pieces.
Thank you for bringing Pat Coleby to everybody's attention!
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Galavanting Goats
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« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2010, 11:04:27 PM »

Hi hannebanane, we thankfully have never at this point needed to use vit c except for the powder which was orally, do you get the vit c liquid over there?, ours is available in liquid form at the local livestock produce, i'm adding in Pats contact details as i'm sure it will help to answer your question about the IV side of things.

http://www.innovativefarming.com/Pastseminarsspeakers.htm

I just noticed there is no email only phone and snail mail, it was posted a few years back but if I find something more updated I will let you know.

I just had to modify my atrocious spelling in my post lol.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2010, 11:10:49 PM by Galavanting Goats » Logged
Galavanting Goats
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« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2010, 11:34:38 PM »

o.k. hannebanane, have a look on page 187 regarding snake bite in your Natural Goat Care book, for those of you who don't have it, it reads as follows:

"...Give 10cc of vitamin c by injection intramuscularly in the side of the neck and repeat in 2 hours if necessary, often the first dose is enough. It is no use looking for a vein to do an intraavenous injection because when an animal is in a state of shock as in snakebit the veins collaps and cannot be found. Failing the injectible vitamin c give 1 heaped teaspoon by mouth every half hour until the goat looks better. The first time I cured a goat of snakebite was before vit c injections were available it was bitten on the mouth but I did not find out until about 2 days later. Somehow some of the venom must have landed in his eyes because they had clouded over, so I gave him some vitamin A (about 40 000 units) as well as 1 heaped teaspoon of vit c. He was becoming a little staggery , but half hour later he was quite alright. I repeated the dose once more...." Pat Coleby Natural Goat Care page 187.

She also suggests to rub sodium ascorbic powder on the wound for the pain which helps alot apparently, takes the pain away within about 3 minutes, she also suggests to put bells on the goat, snaked are deaf but they pick up the vibrations from the bells..
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hannebanane
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« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2010, 12:18:50 AM »

No worries about the spelling Wink! All the Vit C at feed stores is powder; the health food store has oral liquid Vit, but it is ascorbic acid which according to her books should never be used for injection. However, my one goat and 3 horses are started on oral sodium ascorbate now, and in a few days we'll add the seaweed meal, dolomite and garlic. This should give their immune system a tremendous boost.

The horse with a very bad case of founder/laminitis went from being out on pasture to being confined in a stall, which he absolutely hated. To calm him down some, I gave him high doses of magnesium with calming herbs (lavender, valerian, vervain, and more), which - as I found out a few days later when Pat Coleby's books arrived - not only helped his nerves, but magnesium actually turned out to be the alternative (natural) treatment for laminitis. Two weeks ago he could barely walk, and we thought he had to be put down. Now, he is doing much better. Since laminitis generally turns into a chronic condition, I will keep him on all the supplements she recommends and adjust his feed as she suggests.

Once I have a little more time, I will read Natural Goat Care and Natural Horse Care cover to cover, probably several times over, because they contain so much information. Your post could not have come at a better time. Thanks again!
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hannebanane
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« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2010, 12:28:41 AM »

Thank you Galavanting Goats for taking the time to look it up! Obviously sodium ascorbate powder belongs in every barn and first aid kit!
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mountaingoat12
Bottle Babies
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Posts: 34


« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2014, 05:11:07 PM »

I make a mix of citronella, tea tree and lavender oils diluted with olive oil and massage it through the goat's fur. I've found it to be effective with fleas, lice and even mites...
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Pat
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« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2014, 08:34:38 PM »

But don't the oils make them little dirt magnets so they wind up caked with dust, dirt, pollen and hay seeds?
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
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Texas


« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2014, 05:27:41 AM »

Yes it will Pat.  But with that said...anything "oil" based will also do the same thing.  You see it's the oil that keeps these parasites off, not the actual "odor".  You could use straight baby oil and do the same thing.  Mineral oil will work too.

With that said, as good as the "Oils" work, it also will cause heat retention...so this is something you'd do sparingly...a small amount goes a long, long way. 

One day, when I get really brave, and after speaking with a Vet about it, I'd like to try the Equine Celebration spot on...if it's gentle enough for a horses very sensitive skin, and safe enough for a horses very sensitive anatomy...then I can't see why it wouldn't work well for goats, who are equally as sensitive.
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~ Birdie ~
mountaingoat12
Bottle Babies
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Posts: 34


« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2014, 11:12:16 PM »

That's right, use oils sparingly or you'll have one slippery goat!  laugh  I drizzle the oil along their topline like a pour on med, then brush it downwards or massage it throughout with my fingers. A little goes a long way!

And while it may not be an herb, raw Apple cider vinegar is an amazing natural supplement! It repels parasites, increases weight gain, slickens coats, prevent uc and kidney stones, increases digestion and fertility, and increases water intake. I've noticed a huge difference in my goats appearance and production when giving them acv.

You can put some in their water daily, but now a lot of people are leaving it out free choice next to the water bucket.  Just make sure to get the raw stuff with the "mother" in it!
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imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
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Posts: 19149


Texas


« Reply #27 on: May 31, 2014, 06:26:38 AM »

That's right, use oils sparingly or you'll have one slippery goat!  laugh  I drizzle the oil along their topline like a pour on med, then brush it downwards or massage it throughout with my fingers. A little goes a long way!

And while it may not be an herb, raw Apple cider vinegar is an amazing natural supplement! It repels parasites, increases weight gain, slickens coats, prevent uc and kidney stones, increases digestion and fertility, and increases water intake. I've noticed a huge difference in my goats appearance and production when giving them acv.

You can put some in their water daily, but now a lot of people are leaving it out free choice next to the water bucket.  Just make sure to get the raw stuff with the "mother" in it!

mountaingoat...
this forum and it's members have been using ACV for goats for MANY MANY years...many of us keep it out constantly for our goats, along with the option of plain water...so yes, you're right ACV works in many different ways...ours like it straight from the gallon jug. Smiley
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~ Birdie ~
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