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Topic: Novice wants to start a cashmere herd  (Read 12065 times)
Sandie
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« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2010, 09:34:30 PM »

if you are going to try and work with you fiber and spin it yourself you would probably be better to start with a couple of angoras. the cashmere is really fine , it felts super easy so it takes a lot of extra special care to get it ready to spin. mohair is a lot easier to work with especially if you are just starting to learn to spin.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2010, 04:00:29 PM »

How would a long haired fiber type goat do with harnesses? Would it tangle in their hair?
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
AmberLyn
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« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2010, 05:56:09 PM »

I’ve seen pictures of people using long haired goats in harness before. As long as you double check all the gear, which you are supposed to do anyway to avoid pinching, I don’t see why it would be any different. Llamas and alpacas are used to harness and packing ALOT and their hair is just as long, if not longer than that of a fiber goat Grin. You worry more about pinching skin and getting hair pulled into the buckles than tangling since the harness lies over top of the hair. Check, check, and double check your gear.
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Sandie
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« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2010, 07:53:20 PM »

with the angoras they grow hair at about an inch a month so you would have to keep the harness area trimmed regularly or yes it would tangle . and you would want to just use a wether for harnes it takes a lot to make that hair and the stress on a doe would probably cause her to loose her kids and hair would not be good quality because of stress . ( weakens the hair that is growing at the time of stress making it not good quality for spinning )
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AmberLyn
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« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2010, 08:28:42 PM »

Yeah, sweetgoats warned me about making sure that I start with wool or mohair when I’m learning to spin for the same reason that you said Sandie. I don’t intend to raise angoras though. I don’t like the extra maintenance involved with having to shear, rather than brush out the fiber.

I know that there is a REALLY nice cashmere farm up in Maine that holds workshops on everything from animal husbandry, grading fiber and learning to spin it so I’m hoping to get up there for that. I really hope to find someone closer by that could help me though.

No I would not use a doe for harness. Wethers are definitely best. Bucks aren’t safe enough, and as you said, does have too much else uhhh “going on” lol.
Most likely, I will not use any of my good fiber goats for harness since I want them to devote their energy to growing fiber. I will probably only use withers that have really good temperaments, but which don’t give good fiber. That way I don’t have to lose a well tempered goat as a meat goat just because he can’t give high dollar fiber… I know I will still lose a lot of goats that I don’t want to, because you can’t keep them all, but it’s an idea.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2010, 07:24:01 PM »

Is that farm in Maine in Monmouth?
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
Togepi
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« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2010, 03:35:51 AM »

Isn't there one in Starks?  Where in Monmouth, Dragon?  Two of my sisters live there.
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Sally P
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« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2010, 07:30:11 AM »

The girl I know in STarks raises boers and nubians.
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AmberLyn
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« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2010, 10:18:12 AM »

no, the one i'm talking about it is in Bremen, Maine.. Springtide Farm
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Sally P
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« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2010, 11:36:42 AM »

You can google it and get their website.  Sorry but they aren't very well known in the goat world here---I'm not sure how big they are, but cashmere's aren't very popular around here.  Actually, googling up their site was the first time I have heard of them.
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sweetgoats
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« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2010, 01:16:51 PM »

  Actually, Maine has some of the TOP cashmere Breeding farms in the country.  Yes Amber, SpringTide farms is GREAT.  Peter Goth and Wendy.  Super great people.

  A few years ago Maces did a spread with cashmere and cashmere goats.  They were Peter and Wendy's goats.

  I am really excited, he was out judge one year at out state fair and I was lucky to be his ring assistant.  We won Grand Champion doe that year, and he is judging out Estes Park Wool Market this year.   Happy  WooHoo!

 
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Lori

Home of the Colorado State Fair Grand Champion doe, 2003,2004,2005,2007,2008,2009. and 2011.
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dragonlair
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« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2010, 06:23:50 PM »

Not sure where in Monmouth, I just was looking at her sight one day. She has several types of fiber animals..sheep, goats and bunnies i think.
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DragonLair Farm and Kennel in Central Maine with Nubians, Lamanchas and Oberhasli. Of course, combinations of 2 or more breeds happens also.
AmberLyn
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« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2010, 11:31:59 AM »

Yay! not alota homework today so im doing somemore cashmere research. somthing i just thuoght of about the horns..
Sandie, you said that you disbud your angora kids and have had no problems with any of them stressing from heat. I'm currious as to your location. Im located around Maryland/Delaware (i say both becuase i live so 3min from the state line. im right in the middle of the peninsula lol) so we usualy have very distinct seasons. But the hottest we get is 110 degrees F, and thats a summer time extream. Generaly our summers are 80-90 and that lasts 3-4months. The rest of the year is pretty mild-chilly being around 15-65 degrees F

Anyway, i would assum that more northern herds (such as from here up) wouldnt really have much heat stress so horns could be removed without a problem, but any further south you would want to let the horns grow... Any opnions?
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Sandie
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« Reply #28 on: February 20, 2010, 01:35:52 PM »

i live in southeast colorado plains so a lot different than in the mountains , it gets to 100* here most of the summer june through august . 110 is not common but it does get that hot occasionally.  probably the humidity would make a difference though. we are very arid here  25% or less most of the time, so it is not as 'hot' as places with same temps but high humidity. 
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AmberLyn
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« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2010, 07:48:38 AM »

yeah 110 isnt common here, maybe once or twice a year we hit that.. but we have a pretty high humidity for the whole of the year becuase we are right on the water
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