HomeHelpLoginRegister

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 22, 2018, 04:57:08 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search

News
  wcm

Stats
20244 Posts in 1450 Topics by 725 Members
Latest Member: margot
+  Welcome to Goat Beat!
|-+  Goat Cafe; Just the Facts
| |-+  Fiber Goats (Moderators: imalilbirdie, pearplum, nancy d, dragonlair, sweetgoats)
| | |-+  Novice wants to start a cashmere herd
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 Print
Topic: Novice wants to start a cashmere herd  (Read 11674 times)
sweetgoats
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 2975



WWW
« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2010, 01:37:06 PM »

  Amber,  I do not know if you plan on showing the goats (don't remember if we talked about it when you called), but if you do they goats have to have horns.  The only way they can be in a show ring and place is if they polled. 

  I have seen Cashmere goats over heat and die at a show, so I say if you are looking into any Cashmere or Angora goats, I would KEEP the horns.

  Call Anyone of the big farms in Maine like Spring tide farms and they will explain why they need the hors. 
Logged

Lori

Home of the Colorado State Fair Grand Champion doe, 2003,2004,2005,2007,2008,2009. and 2011.
Premier Breeder and Premier Exhibitor for 2008 and 2009.
AmberLyn
Goataholic
***
Posts: 112



« Reply #31 on: February 22, 2010, 07:01:05 PM »

Good point Sweetgoats. The show environment can be pretty high stress, so No I don’t really have much interest in showing, though the more you guys bring it up the more I waver on that. Generally speaking I’m not a fan of shows (I’ve been in a few horse shows so I get the gist) but it could be very good way to gain some public interest in my animals. But that’s another topic Grin

You have me a bit confused thuogh. I think I know what you meant, but your post seems to contradict it. May be a typo Wink.. You said:

“Amber,  I do not know if you plan on showing the goats (don't remember if we talked about it when you called), but if you do they goats have to have horns.  The only way they can be in a show ring and place is if they polled. “

Either you misused the term polled or you have a typo issue going on because polled means no horns Wink. So if they have to be polled to be in a show ring and place, then I would have to have their horns removed if I wished to show them. But you say if I show then let them keep their horns to reduce stress…  clarification please?  Smiley
Logged

Life is random, so am I   =)
Sandie
Guest
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2010, 05:49:34 PM »

amber i am not positive on this cause i don't show but i think she means they have to be horned or  naturally polled. dehorned/disbudded  not allowed.
Logged
AmberLyn
Goataholic
***
Posts: 112



« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2010, 07:15:02 PM »

OH!! Yeah your right sandie! lol it just sounded like she ment one or the other the way i was reading, but you puttin it like that just made my brain go "Click!!" lol ok i feel like im platnum blonde again now (no matter how dark they say my hair is gettin i still cant deny the picutre of me 5 and 7 years old with white hair Roll Eyes )
Logged

Life is random, so am I   =)
booboo
Guest
« Reply #34 on: August 28, 2010, 08:37:05 AM »

 Smiley Hi AmberLyn, did you get your goats and did you get cashmere? I am looking at getting cashmere for the same reasons. Would  love an update on your experience
Logged
AmberLyn
Goataholic
***
Posts: 112



« Reply #35 on: August 31, 2010, 07:59:06 AM »

Oh, shoot, I am so sorry!!! I thought that I had updated you guys on this post about what I had decided.
Ok, so here’s the deal. No I don’t have any goats yet…
 1. Because I’m still gathering information
2. Because I don’t have the money to buy them or the fencing yet
3. Because I have to wait till next year to be able to start converting the field to a pasture because we have a corn crop there at the moment.

That having been said, my plains are to…
1.   Visit local Boer farms and the cashmere farm in upper MD in spring of 2011
2.   Begin fencing in the pasture in summer of 2011
3.   Buy three Boer does from my neighbor in spring of 2012
4.   Decide after one or two breeding of the Bores if I should invest in cashmeres

Unfortunately due to money issues, as well as possible conflicts with my step-dad, this is probably not going to happen in this exact time frame. But I am still very interested so I am continuing to research it. I have chosen to start with the Boers because, as I said before, they are much easier and cheaper to purchase in my area. Thus if it turns out that managing my own herd of goats is not for me or our farm (we don’t have the greatest soil in the world. Very sandy), then I will not have lost much money wise. Plus, one of the main reasons I shied away from raising meat goats was because I don’t think I would handle seeing my babies go off to slaughter, but the reality of it is that no matter what type of goats I raise that is going to have to happen at some point. So starting with raising Boers will make me come to terms with that sooner rather than later (this is another one of the reason why I am so intrigued by that place up north. The man that runs the place is a vet, so they are able to “take care of” all of their own animals instead of having to ship them to a slaughter house. I’m very curious as to how they are able to do that, because trusting someone else to give my animals the respect which they deserve, even during slaughter, is a very big deal to me.)
Logged

Life is random, so am I   =)
AmberLyn
Goataholic
***
Posts: 112



« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2010, 08:09:24 AM »

Oh!!! That reminds me, I have another question!!! It’s about breeding, so I may post this question there as well (I tried to look there the other day to see if maybe someone else had already asked it, but I did not find it)

Ok, so I can find all kinds of great information about how to tell when your goats are in season, and all the different types of breeding. But I really can’t find a clear answer to “When is it a good time to Start to breed a goat?”
I know that they CAN breed at even a very young age (my buck between 4-8months old when he bred a doe. Not on purpose! His previous owner had him sold, but the buyers backed out, and he had no were else to put him at the time.) But how old should they be before they are bred?  6months? 1year? I think I found info from someone on another sight that said they go by weight not age. Is that correct?
Logged

Life is random, so am I   =)
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8923


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #37 on: August 31, 2010, 08:39:02 AM »

No matter whether you have meat goats, fiber goats or dairy goats, I don't believe that a doe should be bred before she is at least almost a year old.  Infact, we seldom breed our yearlings---we prefer to wait until their second year.  I know that is not always the thought process in the meat world.  The fiber goats are a goat of a different nature and I would hold off on them until almost two also.  I think it give the "baby" time to grow some and get stronger.  Breeding year olds (or under) tends -- in the diary wold---to somewhat stunt their growth. 
Angoras/chasmeres do keep their horns.  It is a source of heat escape for their bodies.  Dairy goats are the ones that have to be disbudded/dehorned. 
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19331


Texas


« Reply #38 on: August 31, 2010, 10:48:42 AM »

With our Boers and our Kiko's they aren't bred until they are 13 months to 15 months old.  Boers need time to grow their bones, they need to be on mom's for as long as a mom will let them (if they are doelings--bucklings are weaned at 4 months old, but fed up nicely so they don't loose bone growth). 

I hate to say this..I really do..but the Boers are the weak link of the goat breeds.  They have genetics that can throw massive kids, both in body weights, and if you don't watch the genetics of your Boers, you'll get head lock and shoulder locked kids.  That tears a mom up when those kids get locked in the birthing canal.  It's very hard on them, and the kids, IF they survive it.

I want you to be prepared for all things when you go into Boers.  They demand more attention than any other breed does.  We were very successful with our Boer herd, but it takes A LOT of work to keep them that way.  We ran into the head lock and shoulder lock issues our first year of breeding Boers, and I swear to you, I'll never go through that again. 

They are a tender breed, so make sure you buy good Boers.  They look nice..but those foreheads, horn spreads, and wider than most in the shoulders, will make for hard birthing.  Just be careful, and if you need help..we'll all be here for you..however, I'll be glad to share what experience I have adopted into finding the right buck for the Does, so you prevent head lock, and shoulder lock issues. 
Logged

~ Birdie ~
AmberLyn
Goataholic
***
Posts: 112



« Reply #39 on: August 31, 2010, 01:53:09 PM »

Thank you birdie. Things like that are why I am going to buy my Boers from my neighbor, Ben. He has had his herd for several years, and he is right up the road if I need him. He is also a good friend through my sister and her husband, so I know he isn’t going to lie to me about what to expect from his goats, or give me any of his herd culls. I’m sure he doesn’t have supper supper bloodlines, or I wouldn’t be able to afford him, but I don’t want perfection of bloodline right now, just good genetics.

Also I have heard about things like that from Boers, so i was thinking to steer away from pure breeds anyway. As long as it is healthy, has no family history of genetic issues, and can produce kids with good bodies I will be happy. I'm staying away from anything with fainting genes as well. I know it’s normal and doesn’t hurt them, but it scares me after watching my last goat die of tetanus. Just give me the creeps.
Logged

Life is random, so am I   =)
Sunshine
Guest
« Reply #40 on: August 31, 2010, 02:09:58 PM »

I have usually followed the 80lbs/8months old rule for breeding.. I quit that this year. They usually do okay and seem to grow but it also seems to be a struggle.. I had one not breed last year and she is fanatastic compared to the 2 that did breed. Not that they look like they are knocking on deaths door or anything. But I think waiting till they are at least 1 yr old makes a big difference and one thing I am changing..
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 19331


Texas


« Reply #41 on: September 01, 2010, 06:23:14 AM »

I didn't even go by the 80lbs or 8 months old with boers..meat goats can't handle that..their bones are not strong enough to handle being bred that young.  I think that's a dairy breed time table. 

A good cross breed would be ok Amber..sometimes it really helps the genetics of the boer to be crossed with another breed.  Just don't cross it with a spanish goat.  You'll never keep it in a pen if you do.  They love to jump, and they will jump about any fence you put them behind.

I started out with a few nubian/boer crosses..they were good Does, but couldn't get me to where my breeding program was going, so I sold them after their first kidding.  I buy all my goats young..6 months old or so..and I raise them "my way".  I know their health, I know their behaviors, I know their personalities, and they have plenty of time to learn me, the farm, and the herd they are with.  Then I breed them when it's time to be bred, I take the individual Doe and examine her, if I feel her body hasn't grown well enough at 13 months old to be bred, then I put her off until she's 15 months old.  I like my Does to birth around their 2yr old birthdays.  You get a better foundation in your Doe if you raise it yourself.  You know she hasn't been rushed, you know she's been well cared for, you know all her quirks and behaviors..this means a lot when breeding your Does.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
AmberLyn
Goataholic
***
Posts: 112



« Reply #42 on: September 01, 2010, 09:24:40 AM »

That is exactly what I want to do Birdie!! So glad to hear that I’m not the only one! I just needed the breeding age so I could get my timeline down correctly. And yes I believe that the 80lbs is a dairy thing, only I read 70lbs on the sight I found. That seemed awfully young and small to me, thus why I asked.

But yes, I want to get my three girls from Ben as soon as they are on solid food and ok to be away from their momma so that I can start building that relationship, since they will be my breeding stock (most likely, once I get the cashmeres the only Boers I will have will be those three). My very first goat, Buddy was 2-3months old when I got him and his brother was 8months. Buddy was VERY clingy, but most of that was because he was all alone for several months. Buzz was a huge pain, darn thing was already feral when I got him, and so I definitely want them young. Do you think 2-3months old ok, or is that a bit too young?
Logged

Life is random, so am I   =)
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8923


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #43 on: September 01, 2010, 09:43:54 AM »

If you read 70 pounds on some site, then that was totally incorrect for breeding weight.  Many people do advocate 80 pounds, however, I feel that 90 pounds is much safer.  And then we still wait until they are almost two.
Logged
booboo
Guest
« Reply #44 on: September 01, 2010, 10:58:11 AM »

 Smiley Thanks  AmberLyn for that. I like you, have trouble with the whole slaughter house business. After a lot of soul searching I believe I will only truly know the answer on the day.
There is no cashmere goats here in Slovenia as yet. We would have to get them in either from Italy or the UK. 
Italy is charging for a buck 1,901.99 to 4,437'99 American dollars in our Euros  1,500 to 3,500.
I cant seem to understand why they are so expensive in Italy.

UK price is for a buck averaging 1,1230 American dollars plus transport costs etc. Shocked
 
I had no idea when I started to research these goats that they could possibly cost so much
 
The problem I have now is Ive got my heart set on them Sad
We just cannot afford at present to have goats as pets, we need to at least pay for themselves.
Which leads me to another topic so I will go and post and see what comes up.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.20 :: SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines
Amber design by Bloc | XHTML | CSS