HomeHelpLoginRegister

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 28, 2014, 03:28:40 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search

News
WARNING: DO not EVER click on any link in any email to reset a password UNLESS you yourself requested it. Be safe on the internet. There are many scams out there. Phishing is one of them, no site, from banking to us here at Goatbeat will EVER send an email asking for you to click on a link and reset your password. SO NEVER click on a link and give out personal information.

Stats
44864 Posts in 3030 Topics by 813 Members
Latest Member: Capricorn
+  Welcome to Goat Beat!
|-+  Goat Cafe; Just the Facts
| |-+  Dairy Goats (Moderators: imalilbirdie, Candace, pearplum, nancy d, sweetgoats, Ace)
| | |-+  Disbudding question.
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Topic: Disbudding question.  (Read 1947 times)
boerbaby
Caprine Guru
****
Posts: 398



« on: April 14, 2010, 05:21:25 PM »

Ok - I am getting soooo frustrated with disbudding. We have mostly boer goats but we started out with FB Alpines and I enjoy them and will always keep a few. I usually disbud them but the last couple years I have not had the best of luck. Can't say I like the job or have ever been that good, but I can't for the life of me get a buckling disbudded. They always start to grow some after I disbud. This year I did it a little earlier on the boys 3-4 days because I know their always start to come through a little earlier than the girls.

I have a rhinehart disbudding iron (the one that the tip doesn't change). I let it warm up for 15 mins or so, so that it burns a black ring on a board. I usually trim hair, burn for about 10 secs., rewarm iron for a couple minutes in between horns,  then spray with antiseptic spray. I have always heard to look for the copper ring and I do. What am I doing wrong??? I hate it when they still grow because then they are deformed looking horns. Any suggestions??? Ohh, and yes they always get a tetanus shot first.  Smiley
Logged

Kertz Farm
Pam B
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1624


South Central Michigan


« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2010, 05:48:12 PM »

I have always had a problem with my boys growing scurs no matter how hot my disbudding iron is or how well I think we've done the copper ring thing.  In the past we have gone back a couple weeks later and checked to see if anyone needs their heads re-done.  Even with doing them twice I've had problems with the boys growing scurs.  Previously we waited until the kids were two weeks old to burn their heads.  This year we are trying to catch the boys at one week old.  Even so there have been a couple that actually have little horns breaking through at that young age.  I'm hoping that with the earlier time frame we'll have less do-overs.  I'll have to let you know in a few months how that turns out.
Logged

Willow Fen Farm
Nubian Goats
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17469


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2010, 06:17:37 PM »

Boerbaby;
I have a question for you..if I may..

What do you do with your bucklings?  Do sell them to slaughter?  Now if you're not comfortable answering that..that's ok, you don't have to..however, if you're selling them for slaughter..then why disbud them to begin with?  Same with wethering..I don't wether either..it just seems like the market doesn't care if the boer baby is disbudded or wethered when they are going to be meat anyway.

So, why torture yourself or put the baby through it, if you're selling for slaughter?  Just a question for you to think about if this fits your program..you do not have to answer it.

If you're selling your boys as breeding bucks..it's very common for buyers to realize that they are going to have horns.  Boer goats are less likely to be disbudded when you're selling them and actually a lot of boer goat breeders do not want them disbudded.  I know I didn't..I didn't even look at a buck that was disbudded.  Boer goats aren't boer goats without horns, in my personal opinion.

To show a boer goat, they can have horns..4H kids just tip the horns, they are not required to be disbudded.  So to be honest with you..I wouldn't be disbudding the boys if you're selling them off.  The boys horns will not be that big at 4 months old when usually the boys are weaned and sold. 

Save yourself this headache and trouble.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
Sandie
Guest
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2010, 06:53:49 PM »

birdie is correct if that is your situation and they are boers they don't need to be disbudded unless your fenceing is a problem for them getting caught in. if they are dairy weathers sold for meat the same applies, but you probably should wether them as they will be breeding before they are weaned most likely.  if they are sold for pets then they would probably be better to be disbudded.
billies are harder to do a good job on they have a lot more horn growth than does and the hormones make them grow even faster. the only way i have ever found to do billies is to do them before they are a week old and do the disbudding like you are and then knock the horn cap off and lay your disbudding iron sideways right on the horn nub and burn that down flat then just a few seconds  ( 5-10 depending on how hot your iron is ) reburn around the bud just like you did to start with.
Logged
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8938


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2010, 07:16:49 PM »

The problem may be that your iron is loosing it's ability to heat to the proper temperature and when that happens it's pretty common to get scurs.  Our iron just broke and we had to get a new one.  I was trying to figure out how many kids that iron had disbudded over about 17 years---but gave up.  That Rinehart is a good iron and should last a good long time, however, boys have a broader horn base than the girls do and if you miss one minute piece of horn, you get a scur.  Minis are even harder to do--pygmy and Nigi boys have super wide horn bases.
You do rotate the iron while disbudding don't you?  And as Sandie mentioned:  break off the horn cap after disbudding and then run the iron around the edge of the horn base.
We disbud all our goats whether they are going to market or to the show ring.  We do them before the horn bud breaks thru the skin.  When you can feel it coming up, that's the time to disbud.  Some little boys are born with horn buds so they get done at 2 days of age.
Logged
boerbaby
Caprine Guru
****
Posts: 398



« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2010, 08:52:08 PM »

These are our Alpine bucks that I disbud. Around here anyways, most dairy bucks are disbudded. This little guy in particular, is to go to a new owner that has children and prefers to not have horns.

I sell a few of the Alpine does to familes for milkers and most prefer no horns. Personally, for me it seems strange to see the diaries with horns because I'm so used to it from when my kids(boys) showed. Then, like Birdie, it seems strange to see Boers with no horns, because that's what I'm used to. All in what you like I guess.

My kids never showed market wethers, but I'm pretty sure they have to be disbudded.
Logged

Kertz Farm
nancy d
Herdmaster
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 5138

N.W. WA


« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2010, 08:57:09 PM »

They, Boers DO have a wide deep horn base.
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17469


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2010, 09:03:31 PM »

See I read your opening topic as you were doing the Boer goats, not the alpines.  What Dairy folk demand in their goats is exactly why I will not get into dairy breeds, or rather doing breeding on dairy breeds.  I refuse to remove the horns.

As for the bucklings being wethered..we did have 1 oops breeding..which taught me to pull those boys a little sooner, but definitely not too soon..boer/kiko's they need that milk. 

I thought by your userid you were a boer goat owner..but you do both I suppose.

I still feel the same way about the slaughter boys of any breed..I think it's just wrong to do any procedures to them..why inflict pain to a goat who's future is for meat?  The slaughter houses and most ethinic groups want them intact anyway.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
Pam B
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 1624


South Central Michigan


« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2010, 10:07:17 AM »

Birdie, I have yet to find a processor that will allow an intact buck onto their premises.  They don't want the stink.  They have all said that the smell of a mature buck gets on their equipment and they can't get rid of it.  Then it contaminates the next meat processed.

As for the ethnic groups wanting intact animals, I've also not seen that here.  We have both Mexican and Middle Eastern populations in my area.  I know farmers that specifically raise goats for those markets and they wether their animals.  I know I've heard that about the ethnic groups preferring intact bucks here on GB previously, but that has not been my experience.  Of course I am selling processed meat from mature animals and not the young ones used in religious holiday meals.

At one time I had some African/Ghanan "friends" tell me that they preferred their goat meat with the skin left on it, but the hair had to be burnt off.  A couple years later I learned from another African/Ghanan who was visiting our church that those "friends" were putting me on to have a laugh at me.

Logged

Willow Fen Farm
Nubian Goats
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8938


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2010, 10:36:02 AM »

It's usually a Jamacaian population that wants the intact bucks.  We do not have trouble selling them at the place we take them---but that place is relatively close to New York City and I think a lot of them go there (as meat).
Al to the young boys, the ethnic groups here scoff them up and these are processed in the Muslium tradition.
Logged
Sunshine
Guest
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2010, 10:51:53 AM »

We tried ONE intact buck at a year old for meat.He wasnt smelly either, wasnt in rut either. Don't Feel Good... Wont do it again. Butchered a wether (these 2 were together) at the same time you could definitely tell a different in taste between the two. I ended up feeding the other meat to the dogs which they didnt mind it. But most dogs arent particularly picky..
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17469


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2010, 01:06:03 PM »

I've only sold 3 bucklings for slaughter..they came out of the "oops" breeding, boys out of his sister and mother.  I won't sell that for standing stud herd sires..I won't put my name on that.  It's not the Jamacian population any where in the southern areas..it's Hispanic origins down here..They wanted them straight off the moms.  They didn't want them wethered either.

Different markets for different areas, but by the sounds of it, ours might be a better market, because we don't have to go through all that with the bucklings.  I only sold one buck to slaughter..I didn't know the buyer, I didn't know where he took him, and to be honest with what he did to my Taddy I didn't care.  Angry  I got more out of him than what I paid for him, and I was happy about that.  Had I had my way, I would have shot him dead in the pasture..but hubby insisted that we take him to auction.  As long as he was off my farm, I didn't care. 

I know some breeders in central Missouri who sell intact bucklings..they don't get docked for them at all..in fact they are making more off their intact bucklings 4-6 months old than the folks who are wethering them are getting.
Logged

~ Birdie ~
jhfarms
Goataholic
***
Posts: 192



« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2010, 01:18:58 PM »

We do disbud our weathers because we are selling them to kids for show animals.  We really had a hard time this year disbudding ours.  We had a couple that were extremely difficult to get off.  We do NOT take the horns off our girl babies as they will be sold for herd replacements and as momma's.  They make it easier to catch as well.  I have a brand new disbudder and we still had problems.  I blame it on them being boys and being so hard headed.  (sounds like a good excuse anyways) ROLF
Logged
Sally P
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 8938


New Sharon, Maine


« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2010, 02:02:51 PM »

Go through all that with the bucklings?  Go thru what?  We disbud them when everyone is getting disbudded---wether them at the appropriate time and take them to the auction house when they are the right age.  Not much to it at all.
Logged
imalilbirdie
Herdmasters
Goat Genius
*****
Posts: 17469


Southern Louisiana


« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2010, 02:50:57 PM »

Go thru all that disbudding (wearing out the equipment), wethering (risking infection), and of course our time is worth money too.  Smiley
Logged

~ Birdie ~
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.19 :: SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines
Amber design by Bloc | XHTML | CSS
candlewick